Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Wednesday, September 19. 2019

Today's schedule is BADC

B Block Criminology - Today I'll have you work on three questions from yesterday about crime trends:
  1. Using pages 37 to 46 in the CRIM textbook outline and explain the crime patterns in relation to ecology, firearms, social class, age, gender and race.
  2. What is a chronic offender and what is the significance of Marvin Wolfgang's discovery (why is identifying the chronic offender important)?
  3. How would you explain the gender differences in the crime rate (why do you think males are more violent than females)? 
After a bit we'll talk about victims of crime. Every day we have specific routines we engage in. Many of these routines are tailored to preventing us from becoming victims of crime. We do things like lock our doors, watch where we walk at night, or avoid walking alone. We take these actions because at some level we are afraid of the possibility of being a victim of crime. Despite taking these actions people often fall prey to crime in Canada. So what do we know about victimization?

  1. Women were at higher risk than men of being victims of a violent crime
  2. Age was the key risk factor in violent victimization
  3. Drug use, binge drinking and the frequency of evening activities were associated with the risk of violent victimization
  4. Mental health was associated with the risk of violent victimization
  5. People who suffered child maltreatment were more likely to be victims of a violent crime
  6. People with a history of homelessness were more likely to report being a victim of a violent crime
  7. The risk of violent victimization was higher among people residing in a neighbourhood with low social cohesion
  8. Aboriginal people, in particular women, were more likely to be victims
  9. One-quarter of violent incidents took place at the victim’s place of work
  10. The majority of offenders were male and, on average, in their early thirties
  11. Most victims knew their attacker
  12. Most violent incidents did not involve weapons and did not result in physical injury
  13. Low social cohesion was associated with a higher risk of household victimization
  14. Households residing in apartments or condos were less likely to be victimized by household crime
  15. The size of the household was linked to the risk of victimization
  16. One incident in five resulted in losses of $1,000 or more
  17. Most incidents of victimization did not come to the attention of the police
A & D Blocks Human Geography - Today we'll try to answer the Key Question "Why Is Global Population Increasing"? Geographers most frequently measure population change in a country or the world as a whole through three measures -  crude birth rate, crude death rate, and natural increase rate and we'll look at those today along with measures of fertility and mortality along with population pyramids.


You'll have some questions to work on for me in order to understand our key concept:

  1. About how many people are being added to the world’s population each year?
  2. How does the TFR in your family compare to the overall figure for North America? 
  3. Match the Country with the population pyramid and explain why (Canada, Chad & Germany)
  4. Name a type of community that might have a lot more males than females. Why so?
We'll also play around a bit on Gapminder to visualize these statistics

Monday, September 17, 2018

Tuesday, September 18. 2018

Today's schedule is CDAB

D & A Block Human Geography - Today we'll look at the Key Question: Where Is the World’s Population Distributed? Human beings are not distributed uniformly across Earth’s surface. We can understand how population is distributed by examining two basic properties - concentration and density. Today we'll examine where populations are concentrated looking at the concept of ecumene. Lastly we'll look at density in terms of arithmetic, physiological and agricultural forms. You've got three questions to answer for me today:
  1.  Why isn’t North America one of the four major population clusters?
  2. On the map in the week 3 package...use the maps on page 47 to prepare a sketch map that shows non-ecumene and very sparsely inhabited lands (remember map basics!)
  3.  In terms of food supply, which combination of measures of density is most important when considering whether a country’s population is too large? Why?



The national agricultural ecumene includes all dissemination areas with 'significant' agricultural activity.

B Block Criminology - You now know that the crime data indicate that rates have declined significantly in the past few years and are now far less than they were a decade ago. One of the major suspected causes for the crime rate drop is the age structure of society; the number of young males in Canada is lower than before and the data sources show relatively stable patterns in the crime rate. Ecological patterns show that crime varies by season and by urban versus rural environment, however there is evidence of gender patterns in the crime rate: Men commit more crime than women. Age is one of the largest influences on crime; young people commit more crime than the elderly (and there are fewer young people in society). Crime data show that people commit less crime as they age, but the significance and cause of this pattern are still not completely understood.

Although police-reported crime in Canada (measured by the Crime Severity Index CSI) increased for the second year in a row in 2016, the national CSI increased only 1% but remained 29% lower than a decade earlier in 2006. Highlights of the Stats Can Report show:

  1. In 2016, the overall volume and severity of violent crime, as measured by the violent CSI, was virtually unchanged from the previous year.
  2. The overall volume and severity of non-violent crime, as measured by the non-violent CSI rose  2%  from the previous year (largely driven by increases in police-reported incidents of fraud).
  3. After notable increases in property offences in 2015, police-reported crime rates for all types of property crimes decreased or remained the same in 2016, with the exception of theft of $5,000 or under and total fraud. The rate of total fraud, which includes general fraud (+14%), identity fraud (+16%) and identity theft (+21%), was 14% higher than in 2015.
  4. Police-reported rates of cannabis-related drug offences declined for the fifth consecutive year in 2016. The rate of possession of cannabis declined 12% from 2015 
  5. The rate of impaired driving decreased by 3% in 2016 to 194 impaired driving incidents per 100,000 population, representing the fifth consecutive decline.

The slight increase in the national CSI between 2015 and 2016 was primarily driven by a continued increase in the rate of fraud (+14%). Increases in police-reported rates of administration of justice offences, sexual violations against children and child pornography were also reported. These increases were offset by fewer police-reported incidents of breaking and entering, mischief and robbery resulting in a slight increase to Canada’s CSI compared to 2015.
Between 2015 and 2016, 20 of 33 of Canada’s census metropolitan areas (CMAs) reported increases in their Crime Severity Index (CSI). Calgary, which had the largest increase in CSI in 2015 (+30%), reported a 6% decline in 2016 primarily driven by decreases in breaking and entering and robbery. Similarly, of the other four CMAs which had recorded the largest increase in 2015, Victoria (-12%), Abbotsford-Mission (-5%) and Moncton (-4%) also reported declines in their CSIs in 2016. In Edmonton, however, crime continued to increase (+3%) as a result of increases in theft of $5,000 or under and fraud.Regina (125.8) and Saskatoon (117.8) were the CMAs with the highest CSIs in 2016, as has been the case since 2010. Relatively high CSIs were recorded in Edmonton (105.7), Winnipeg (103.9), Kelowna (100.3), Vancouver (94.3) and Abbotsford-Mission (91.4). These seven CMAs also had the highest police-reported crime rates in 2016

 Today I'll have you work on three questions about crime trends:
  1. Using pages 37 to 46 in the CRIM textbook outline and explain the crime patterns in relation to ecology, firearms, social class, age, gender and race.
  2. What is a chronic offender and what is the significance of Marvin Wolfgang's discovery (why is identifying the chronic offender important)?
  3. How would you explain the gender differences in the crime rate (why do you think males are more violent than females)? 

Sunday, September 16, 2018

Monday, September 17. 2018

Today's schedule is ABCD

A & D Blocks Human Geography - Today to help answer the Key Question: Why Are Some Human Actions Not Sustainable? we'll examine the concept of possibilism connected to sustainability and cultural ecology. Yesterday we looked at the United Nations Sustainable Development goals and today we'll examine two examples of how human beings have altered the physical environment in the Netherlands and in Florida. From the text...
Few ecosystems have been as thoroughly modified by humans as the Netherlands and Florida's Everglades. Because more than half of the Netherlands lies below sea level, most of the country today would be under water if it were not for massive projects to modify the environment by holding back the sea. Meanwhile, the fragile landscape of south Florida has been altered in insensitive ways.
So I'd like you to identify in point form the problems in both these locations and explain what have humans done (Describe the human modifications and adaptations to these two environments).







At the bottom of the page in our week 2 package I'd also like you to answer the following:

Both the Netherlands and the Florida Everglades face threats to sustainability. Which is better positioned to face future challenges? Explain your answer.    


B Block Criminology - Today we will be in the library working on our second journal / blog entry. I would like you to tell me what you think about crime trends here in Canada / B.C. Specifically, I want you to tell me what you think about drug related crime. Violent and property crime patterns are generally decreasing however the one area that is on the rise is drug possession, trafficking, importing, and exporting (specifically possession of marijuana - up 4% since 2002 - and cocaine - up 19% since 2002 see Stats Can CSI here).

In addition to this Stats Can states, "British Columbia has consistently had a relatively high rate of police-reported drug offences. Regardless of the type of drug or the type of offence, the rates of drug crime in British Columbia have been among the highest in Canada for 30 years. In 2007, the total drug crime rate in this province (654 incidents per 100,000 population) was more than double the rate in Saskatchewan, the next highest province. In accordance with the province as a whole, relatively high rates of drug offences are found in the census metropolitan areas (CMA) of Vancouver, Victoria and Abbotsford. Along with Trois-Rivières and Gatineau, these cities have reported the highest rates in Canada for the past five years. The rates in Vancouver and Victoria have been among the highest in the country since 1991".

So....Today you will need to write your thoughts on the following: Why has British Columbia consistently had high rates of police reported drug offences? Use what you've learned about crime theories and your own thoughts on crime theories to answer why. Once you've done this, then find an article about a recent drug crime here in B.C., make a link to the news article on your blogsite and then write how crime theories explain the crime (Look at this news about a 35 kilogram cocaine bust off in the Kootenays or this news about six people arrested in Saanich for 26 litres of GHB gamma-Hydroxybutyric acid a date-rape drug, 100 grams of crystal meth, four ounces of heroin, 16 grams of marijuana and $20,000 cash). Don't forget excellent crime news websites are the CANOE CNews Crime site...or the Toronto Star Crime site...or  Global News Crime site...or the Huffington Post Canada Crime ...or the Vancouver Sun Crime Blog

Thursday, September 13, 2018

Friday, September 14. 2018

Today's schedule is CDAB

D & A Blocks Human Geography - Today we'll look at the Key Question: Why Are Some Human Actions Not Sustainable? We'll look at what a resource is (renewable and non-renewable) along with the uses and misuses of resources by humans. We'll figure out what "sustainability" means and take a look at the United Nations ambitious goals for sustainable development. I'll need you to fill in the chart in your week 2 package on the three pillars of sustainability: environment, economy, and society. Lastly, we'll look at systems and spheres

University of Twente System Theory
Principa Cybernetica Web What is Systems Theory
Fundamentals of Physical Geography Introduction to Systems Theory
Human Ecology Chapter 2 Populations and Feedback Systems

For more on Spheres check out:
Earth System Science in a Nutshell @SERC
Earth Systems Interactions

B Block Criminology - Some people think that since there is so much crime happening they feel the need to take on crime themselves. There are some costumed "super-hero" vigilantes in Seattle - members of the Rain City Superhero Movement. Check out the Seattle PI article on them here. You can check out the article and video from Good Morning America on Phoenix Jones broken nose here. You can watch the Young Turks video on the Rain City Superheroes here.

 And we'll watch the full doc  here...

Wednesday, September 12, 2018

Thursday, September 13. 2018

Today's schedule is DCBA

D & A Blocks Human Geography - Today we'll talk about the arrangement of people and activities found in space and try to understand why those people and activities are distributed the way they are. We'll figure out what density, distribution, concentration and pattern have to do with people an activities on the Earth's surface. Along with this we'll look at connections, diffusion, interaction and hearths in order to see how people and activities impact and are impacted by each other (through spatial interaction and networks). I'll have some definitions for you to work on for me and we'll finish Crash Course Globalization (#1)

and take a look at Crash Course Globalization (#2)


B Block Criminology - Today we'll start with what we didn't get to yesterday...the history of crime and law (looking at Hammurabi, the Mosaic Code and the development of Common Law in England). We'll learn what Actus Reus, Mens Rea, Mala in Se and Mala Prohibitum mean along with taking a look at the differences between Indictable, Summary Conviction and Absolute Liability Offences.Then, I'd like you to come up with a list of 5 Violent, 5 Property and 5 Social crimes in Canada and identify if you think they are on the increase, decrease or are steady.

Violent violations include: homicide, attempted murder, sexual assault (levels 1-3), assault level 3 aggravated, assault level 2 weapon or bodily harm, assault level 1, assault peace officer, assaulting with a weapon or causing bodily harm to a peace officer, aggravated assault to a peace officer, robbery, criminal harassment, uttering threats, sexual violations against children, firearms (use of, discharge, pointing), forcible confinement or kidnapping, abduction, extortion, Indecent/Harassing communications, commodification of sexual activity,

Property violations include: B&E, theft of motor vehicle, theft over $5000, theft under $5000, mischief, possession of stolen property,  trafficking in stolen property, fraud, identity theft, identity fraud, arson, altering, removing or destroying vehicle identification number (VIN).

Social violations include: disturbing the peace, impaired driving, child pornography (possession, production and distribution), drug offences (possession, production and distribution), weapons (possession, production and distribution), prostitution (purchasing sexual services or communicating with the intention of buying sex)

We'll look at what you think and then we'll start with a look at the BC Crime trends from 1998 - 2007 and then we'll talk about the disparity (difference) between the public perception of violent crime and the actual rates of violent crime in Canada....hint take a look to the left.

The crime data indicate that rates have declined significantly in the past few years and are now far less than they were a decade ago. Suspected causes for the crime rate drop include an increasing prison population, more police on the street, the end of the crack epidemic and the age structure of society. The data sources show relatively stable patterns in the crime rate. Ecological patterns show that crime varies by season and by urban versus rural environment, however there is evidence of gender patterns in the crime rate: Men commit more crime than women. Age is one of the largest influences on crime; young people commit more crime than the elderly (and there are fewer young people in society)
. Crime data show that people commit less crime as they age, but the significance and cause of this pattern are still not completely understood. Similarly, racial and class patterns appear in the crime rate. However, it is still unclear whether these are true differences or a function of discriminatory law enforcement.
CTV News Crime Severity
Canada's Most Dangerous Places Maclean's
Stats Can Crime Severity Index (Police Reported Crime)
Crime in Canada Charts
RCMP Crime Statistics Surrey, BC