Tuesday, April 23, 2019

Wednesday, April 24. 2019

Today's schedule is BADC-L

9:05 am – 10:05 am Block - B
10:10 am – 11:10 am Block- A
11:10 am – 12:00 pm Lunch Break
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Block - D
1:05 pm – 2:05 pm Block- C
2:05 pm – 3:15 pm Personalized Learning

B Block Human Geography - Today we'll examine the key issue: Why Do Ethnicities Have Distinct Distribution? We'll start with a quick review of the triangular slave trade and the concentrated population of African Americans in the American southeast (you know...due to slavery). Then we'll look at the inter-regional migration from the rural U.S. South to northern and western urban areas in the mid to late 20th Century. Connected to this will be "Jim Crow" laws, "white flight", and civil rights. Lastly we'll look at Apartheid in South Africa and you'll have some questions to work on for me.







A Block Physical Geography - Good job on the test yesterday family! Remember that week 10 work and the Medicine Hat topographic map? I need that from you...Today

Oh today we start with weather, the best topic ever! I'll have you brainstorm a list of things you know (or think you know) about weather and then I'll try to answer questions you've always wanted answered about the topic. I'm so excited to be starting weather! Hail, lightning, tornadoes, and hurricanes are four on "the list" get ready, it's going to be a bumpy ride. Why study weather, besides the fact that it is awesome...yes it is and you know it, maybe because it can impact our lives significantly.  In 2018, there were 14 separate billion-dollar weather and climate disaster events across the United States, with a total cost of $91 billion. The total cost over the last 3 years (2016-2018) exceeds $450 billion — averaging $150 billion / year. The total cost over the last 5 years (2014-2018) is approximately $500 billion — averaging $100 billion / year

Every day we are going to start by looking at the synoptic forecast along with weather maps.
Data Streme
Envrionment Canada: Weather Office Comox

The Weather Network

D Block Law - Today we'll take a look at Insane Automatism or NCR. The defence of mental disorder is codified in section 16 of the Canadian Criminal Code which states, in part:
Defence of mental disorder
16. (1) No person is criminally responsible for an act committed or an omission made while suffering from a mental disorder that rendered the person incapable of appreciating the nature and quality of the act or omission or of knowing that it was wrong. 
This provision only applies where the individual has a guilty verdict entered. Section 16 will have the effect of avoiding a conviction being entered and a penalty being imposed.

The government of Canada passed Bill C-30 in 1992, which made the NCRMD defense (not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder or NCR for short) lawful. A person is not found Not Criminally Responsible just because they are suffering from a mental illness at the time of the commission of the crime; it must also be proven they:

  1. did not have the capacity to appreciate their actions, 
  2. know right from wrong at the time of the offence, 
  3. or if they were not in control of their behaviour because of their mental illness. 
The defence must prove the accused is NCR on the ‘balance of probabilities’ or more likely than not.  The accused may raise the defence of "NCR at any time during the course of a trial, including after a finding of guilt but before a conviction is entered.The accused may lead evidence of NCR either during trial or after a verdict of guilt. However, if done after verdict, the defence cannot argue that there was no Mens Rea. A court may order an assessment under s. 672.11 for the purpose of determining if the accused is unfit to stand trial or was suffering from a mental disorder so as to be exempt from criminal responsibility. Before a Court may order such an assessment, it is necessary that the Court have "reasonable grounds to believe" that the evidence from an assessment would be necessary to determine the issue in question.

So today we'll look at the murder of Timothy Richard McLean who was stabbed repeatedly by Vince Li on Greyhound bus No. 1170 travelling from Edmonton to Winnipeg on the Trans Canada Highway.





C Block Criminology - Some of us will have started out watching crime through the relatively innocent eyes of Scooby Doo. As you know, Scooby Doo is a long-running animated television series produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions (and now Cartoon Network Studios) from 1969 to 1991 and 2002 to present highlighting the hi jinx of Scooby-Doo and four teenagers: Fred "Freddie" Jones, Daphne Blake, Velma Dinkley, and Norville "Shaggy" Rogers. These five drive around the world in a van called the "Mystery Machine," and solve mysteries typically involving tales of ghosts and other supernatural forces. At the end of each episode, the supernatural forces turn out to have a rational explanation (usually a criminal of some sort attempting to scare people away so that he/she could commit crimes).  Main versions include:

Scooby-Doo and Guess Who? (2019-?)
Be Cool, Scooby Doo (2015-2018)
Scooby Doo, Mystery Incorporated (2010-2013)
What’s New Scooby Doo (2002-2006)
The New Scooby and Scrappy Doo Show (1983-1984)
Scooby Doo and Scrappy Doo (1979-1982)
The Scooby-Doo Show (1976-1978)
Scooby Doo Where Are You (1969-1970)
There are some other versions we will never discuss...like ever!


So today I'd like you to watch the most recent incarnation...Be Cool, Scooby Doo. We'll watch the episode "Poodle Justice" where Scooby gets to visit the set of his favorite TV show. Here, he meets the lovely dog actress star, Lady Annabelle (his celebrity crush). Unfortunately, he doesn't have the courage to talk to her, and to make matters worse, a gargoyle is scaring everyone off set. This sets us up for our deeper look into the franchise and the messaging it sends about crime and society. I'll have you watch a few incarnations and give you questions about them to analyse and make sense of. After, you'll have time to complete the questions from yesterday's Social Order Crime work

Monday, April 22, 2019

Tuesday, April 23. 2019

Today's schedule is CDAB

C Block Criminology - Okay so let's wrap this up. Last week we looked at gangs. From Foreign Policy:
Drugs are just the tip of the iceberg. In the popular U.S. television series Breaking Bad, about a high school teacher turned methamphetamine kingpin, there was an instructive exchange. When the show's antihero, Walter White, was asked whether he "was in the meth business or the money business," he replied, "I'm in the empire business." The same can be said of the DTOs (Drug Trafficking Organizations), which are independent and competing entities. The sale of cocaine, heroin, marijuana, and meth remains extremely profitable. The U.S. Justice Department has put the cartels' U.S. drug trade at $39 billion annually. But the DTOs have diversified their business considerably, both to increase their profits and to exclude rivals from new sources of revenue. For example, they are dealing increasingly in pirated intellectual property, like counterfeit software, CDs, and DVDs. The most destructive new "product," however, is people. The cartels have built a multi billion-dollar business in human trafficking, including the shipment of both illegal immigrants and sex workers.



Gangs are often considered "immoral" and their profit comes from many "immoral" things.  Immoral acts are distinguished from crimes on the basis of the social harm they cause. Acts that are believed to be extremely harmful to the general public are usually outlawed, whereas acts that only the harm the actor themselves are more likely to be tolerated. Acts that are illegal because they are viewed as a threat to morality are called public order crimes. I'll remind you that we already looked at the difference between what is deviant and what is criminal and this topic covers crimes that straddle the line between the two. People who lobby hard for their morals to become law are called moral entrepreneurs or crusaders. The power of moral entrepreneurs can be quite strong and we'll see that today.

Think about Mother's Against Drunk Driving (MADD). From Craig Reinarman's article Social Construction of an Alcohol Problem:
The credibility of MADD, especially at its outset, was impeccable. The parents of children who have been killed in drunk-driving accidents are exceptionally strong symbols. There are few groups of victims who can inspire as much sympathy and adherence as the grieving mother. And this is one of the central foundations of MADD's success. The organisation was started in August of 1980 in Sacramento, California by a woman named Candy Lightner whose daughter had been killed by a hit-and-run drunk driver with multiple DUI (driving under the influence) convictions some 4 months prior. During the criminal proceedings Lightner was appalled by the apparent leniency and lack of concern demonstrated by the justice system towards drunk drivers and the rights of the victim. The campaign began with her tireless lobbying in the initial months and a strong push to make drunk driving a political issue where it had previously not been. 

Consider the following: Sir Patrick Devlin stated…
Without shared ideas on politics, morals, and ethics no society can exist…. If men and women try to create a society in which there is no fundamental agreement about good and evil, they will fail; if having based it on common agreement, the argument goes, the society will disintegrate. For society is not something that is kept together physically; it is held by the invisible bonds of common thought. If the bonds were too far relaxed, the members would drift apart. A common morality is part of the bondage. The bondage is part of the price of society; and mankind, which needs society, must pay its price. 

As you can see, the power of moral entrepreneurs can be quite strong. So, to curb the power of cartels or gangs should we take some radical action? Should we cut off their source of income (like drugs and sex trade workers)? Here are two questions for you to answer:
  1. Should drugs be legalized? Why? If you believe drugs should be legalized, think about whether all drugs should be legalized or just a select few. Why should certain drugs be legalized and others not? 
  2. Should prostitution be legalized? Why? If you believe it should be legalized, should all the forms of prostitution described in your text be legalized, or only a select few? If prostitution were legalized should government be able to exercise some control over it? 
For the legalization of drugs question as you probably already know, the federal government legalized non-medical cannabis on October 17, 2018. So why? Part of the reason was that the proceeds from the illegal drug trade support organized crime and greater threats to public safety, like human trafficking and hard drugs.

For more check out this Vice article here or the video below..


For the sex trade question "Should we legalize prostitution"? Think about the two opposing views:
  • Sexual Equality View The prostitute is a victim of male dominance. In patriarchal societies, male power is predicated on female subjugation, and prostitution is a clear example of this gender exploitation 
  • Free Choice View Prostitution, if freely chosen, expresses woman’s equality and is not a symptom of subjugation.
To help, we will understand the different types of sex trade workers (street walkers, circuit travelers, bar girls, brothels, call girls and escort services). We'll look at some high profile cases (like all the way back in 2008 former New York state governor Eliot Spitzer or 1990's Hollywood "Madame" Heidi Fleiss who was quoted as saying, "I took the oldest profession on Earth and I did it better than anyone on Earth. Alexander the Great conquered the world at 32. I conquered it at 22."). It is important to note:

The Supreme Court of Canada struck down the country's anti-prostitution laws in a unanimous decision, and gave Parliament one year to come up with new legislation — should it choose to do so. In striking down laws prohibiting brothels, living on the avails of prostitution and communicating in public with clients, the top court ruled that the laws were over-broad and "grossly disproportionate." The government replaced the law with Bill C-36 (2014) which received Royal Assent and became law on December 6, 2014. These laws are being challenged once again in the Supreme Court of Canada. To find out more check out more on the escort agency challenge here.


D Block Law - Today we will begin our look at criminal law defenses focusing on alibi (disputing the Actus Reus) and automatism (disputing the Mens Rea) and I'll give you a handout that has some really good notes to help you with defenses. We'll review the Kenneth Parks homicidal somnambulism case (sleepwalking murder R. v. Parks, 1992).

In the 2013 movie "Side Effects" Emily Taylor, despite being reunited with her husband from prison, becomes severely depressed with emotional episodes and suicide attempts. Her psychiatrist, Jonathan Banks, after conferring with her previous doctor, eventually prescribes an experimental new medication called Ablixa. The plot thickens when the side effects of the drug lead to Emily killing her husband in a "sleepwalking" state.
 
After we look at automatism as a defense, we'll also look at the "excusable conduct" defenses of self-defence, necessity, duress, ignorance of the law, entrapment, legal duty and provocation.

BTW you have a test this Friday...here is a review of things to know:

Chapter 4
What is a crime (also just know they are in the Criminal Code)
Purpose of Criminal Law (protect us and our property, maintain order, retribution & rehab)
Summary Conviction, Indictable and Hybrid offenses (what & max penalty)
Mens Rea Actus Reus
MR – Intent; Recklessness; Wilful Blindness; Criminal Negligence
Motive (diff between that and intent)
Attempt & Conspiracy
Parties to an Offence – Aider; Abettor; Accessory after the fact
Court Structure (Provincial Criminal Div; Superior/Supreme Provincial; Prov. Appeal; Supreme Court of Canada)

Chapter 5
RPG
3 Options for police (arrest; appearance notice; arrest warrant)
Steps in lawful arrest
Citizen’s arrest
Legal searches (warrants & exceptions; rules- gender)
Rights upon arrest / detention
Pre-trial release (bail/recognizance)
Disclosure
Arraignment/Plea/Preliminary Hearing/plea bargaining

Chapter 7
Violent Crime
Homicide levels (Murder x2); Manslaughter; Infanticide
Assault/Sexual Assault (for SA age of consent and consent)
Robbery (theft with violence or threat of)
Property Crime
Arson
Theft (colour of right)
B&E (must include intent to commit an indictable offence)
Weapons (firearms) Restricted, Non-Restricted and Prohibited – PAL & CFSC
Street Racing definition and penalty
Prostitution (Procuring & Solicitation)
Drugs (possession and trafficking) medicinal pot – controlled vs prohibited substances
Impaired driving (80 mg / 100 ml = 0.08) – spot checks/breathalyzer/blood test

Chapter 8
Alibi
Non Insane Automatism vs Insane Automatism (NCR) – fitness hearing
Intoxication (intent – specific to general)
Battered Woman (Spouse) Syndrome
Self Defence (reasonable)
Necessity vs Duress
Provocation
Double Jeopardy
Entrapment

A Block Physical Geography - Today is your Gradation unit test. Your first order of business is to relax and then dazzle me with what you know. Answer every question and if you're confused about anything ask for clarification. Make sure you understand what each question is asking of you. Breathe. You have the entire block if you need it (you won't) and then you may finish up your week 10 questions or your Medicine Hat topographic map assignment or you know you're week 9 work that counted on last term...the one that's over now?!

B Block Human Geography - Today we'll look at the key question Where Are Ethnicities Distributed? With this we'll examine this question both in a Canadian and an American context (as the text is American we will supplement it and add Canada to the conversation). The meaning of ethnicity is often confused with the definition of race and nationality. Ethnicity is identity with a group of people who share cultural traditions of a particular homeland or hearth. In Canada more than 200 ethnic origins were reported by respondents to the 2011 National Household Survey, 57.9% of the population reported one ethnic origin and the rest, 42.1%, reported more than one origin. In the 2016 Census, over 250 ethnic origins or ancestries were reported by the Canadian population. Who are they and where are they distributed across Canada are what we'll look at today.

Vancouver Sun: Almost 7 in 10 Metro residents will be non-white in two decades
Ethnic and cultural origins of Canadians: Portrait of a rich heritage
CBC News 21.9% of Canadians are immigrants, the highest share in 85 years
CTV News Latest census numbers showcase Canada's ever-evolving ethnic diversity


Open Text BC Introduction to Sociology text "Race and Ethnicity" chapter

Wednesday, April 17, 2019

Thursday, April 18. 2019

Today's schedule is DCBA

D Block Law - Today we are back in the library for our last day to work on our Canadian Criminal Defense project. Don't forget that you need to find two recent (in the last two years) criminal cases where a defense we discussed this past week was used. The defenses are: Alibi, Non-Insane Automatism, Intoxication, Insane Automatism, Battered Woman Syndrome, Self-defense, Necessity, Duress, Ignorance of the law, Mistake of fact, Entrapment, Double jeopardy, and Provocation. Places to find cases - CanLII is a non-profit organization managed by the Federation of Law Societies of Canada. CanLII's goal is to make Canadian law accessible for free on the Internet. Click through the databases on the side (provinces and territories) and search by year (2018-2017-2016)...anytime you see Supreme/Superior court or court of Queen's Bench you'll find serious criminal cases (remember look for R. v. in the case citation). You may also look at The Courts of British Columbia JudgmentsOntario Superior Court of Justice Judgments (you can find a link to all provinces' and territories' courts here)

C Block Criminology - Since we didn't get to it yesterday, today we'll watch a documentary called Generation Z: Child Soldiers of the Zetas. This documentary is about "Los Zetas" and the drug corridor along the Nuevo Laredo - Texas border. Miguel Treviño Morales, alias "Z-40," the leader of Los Zetas was captured an arrested in July 2013 however los Zetas still survive (as does Sinaloa and others).
Economist - Mexican Drug War
InSight Crime Los Zetas
CNN Mexican "Drug War" fast facts
National Post Los Zetas Trevino Morales



There is a very good article in Foreign Policy magazine that explains the impact of the Mexican cartels on the USA... From the magazine
This past February Chicago declared Sinaloa cartel leader Joaquín "El Chapo" Guzmán its first "Public Enemy No. 1" since Al Capone. "While Chicago is 1,500 miles from Mexico, the Sinaloa drug cartel is so deeply embedded in the city that local and federal law enforcement are forced to operate as if they are on the border," Jack Riley, the head of the Drug Enforcement Administration's Chicago office, told CNN.

The infiltration of the Windy City shows the extent to which Mexican drug syndicates have made inroads in the United States -- the Associated Press and others have reported that cartel cells are operating in Atlanta, Ga., Louisville, Ky., Columbus, Ohio, and rural North Carolina. In fact, according to an excellent National Post infographic based on data from a U.S. Justice Department report and other sources, it's much easier to list states that don't have a drug trade tied to Mexican gangs. There are only twelve that haven't reported the presence of one of four Mexican cartels since 2008: Alabama, Alaska, Connecticut, Hawaii, Idaho, Maine, Montana, North Dakota, Utah, Vermont, WestVirginia, and Wisconsin. The Mexican drug trade is everywhere else.

Detected cartel operations range from traditional drug-running to using a horse ranch as a front for laundering drug money, as one group did in Oklahoma. The Sinaloa cartel, which has emerged as Mexico's dominant syndicate, has carved out new territory in the United States by controlling 80 percent of its meth trade (Mexican cartels have come to dominate the U.S. market by aggressively bumping up the purity of their meth while dropping the price per gram). All told, Mexican cartels reside in 1,200 American communities as of 2011, up from 230 in 2008, according to the Associated Press.

Another great article for the magazine states...
Drugs are just the tip of the iceberg. In the popular U.S. television series Breaking Bad, about a high school teacher turned methamphetamine kingpin, there was an instructive exchange. When the show's antihero, Walter White, was asked whether he "was in the meth business or the money business," he replied, "I'm in the empire business."
The same can be said of the DTOs, which are independent and competing entities -- not an association like OPEC. The sale of cocaine, heroin, marijuana, and meth remains extremely profitable. The U.S. Justice Department has put the cartels' U.S. drug trade at $39 billion annually. But the DTOs have diversified their business considerably, both to increase their profits and to exclude rivals from new sources of revenue. For example, they are dealing increasingly in pirated intellectual property, like counterfeit software, CDs, and DVDs. The most destructive new "product," however, is people. The cartels have built a multibillion-dollar business in human trafficking, including the shipment of both illegal immigrants and sex workers.

What the DTOs are really selling is logistics, much like Wal-Mart and Amazon.com. Wal-Mart was one of the first retailers to run its own fleet of trucks, providing tailored shipping at a lower cost that in turn gave the company an edge over its competitors. Similarly, Amazon may have started as a bookseller, but its dominance, as Fast Companyput it, is "now less about what it sells than how it sells," providing a distribution hub for all sorts of products. Drug-trafficking organizations are using the same philosophy to cut costs, better control distribution, and develop new sources of revenue.The one element of the U.S.-Mexico relationship that has received no shortage of attention is the border, yet the technology and money dedicated to enhancing security there have not been enough to thwart creative DTOs. The Sinaloa cartel, for example, has an extensive network of expertly constructed tunnels under the border, some featuring air-conditioning. (The workers who build the tunnels are frequently executed after the work is completed.) At the other extreme, traffickers have used catapults to launch deliveries from Mexico into the United States.
Logistics, then, are the DTOs' main source of revenue, and illegal drugs are but one of the products they offer. As the cartels' revenue streams become increasingly diversified, the drug trade will become less and less important. In fact, the prospect of the DTOs' selling their services to terrorists, say by transporting weapons of mass destruction across the U.S.-Mexico border, has begun to frighten analysts both inside and outside government. 

And from the Daily Beast:
The songs (Narcocorrido) sound like a cross between mariachi and polka and come from the norteño folk tradition. The first of these ballads go as far back as the 1930s, and the lyrics, while they’ve always dealt with drug traffickers and murderers, have, since the Mexican drug wars began in 2006, become exponentially swaggering in their brazen glorification of violence.Americans listen to gangster rap and love to watch mob flicks. We relish crime depicted well and expect a level of authenticity in the portrayal. It’s nothing out of the ordinary to hire mafia members as movie consultants. We might even prefer musicians with street cred. It seems that as consumers we demand the real thing, not some impostor. 
So from Breaking Bad a Narcocorrido about Heisenberg (Walter White)

I guess it's kind of like a Mexican version of



B Block Human Geography - Today we are back in the library for your last day to work on your information graphic poster on an endangered language. Remember, for your endangered language you’ll need to:
  1. Show where the endangered language originated and diffused to (yes on a map).
  2. Show the connection to the family, branch, and group of the endangered language. (Use your best judgment on this). 
  3. Show where the language is spoken today, indicate how many people speak it.
  4. Show Unique features of this endangered language (What makes it different to and similar than others?)
  5. Show examples of how the language is written and or spoken 
  6. Show why your endangered language is important to save
  7. Show how your endangered language is both being threatened (contributing factors) and being saved
  8. Show how people can find more info (links...sources cited)
See me if you need help or assistance. This project is due a week from yesterday - email me your digital infoposter.

A Block Physical Geography - Today you have the block to finish your work on the Medicine Hat Topographic map. You need your Canadian Landscape topographic map book and the Medicine Hat map can be found on pages 40-42. You will need to work on questions 1 a, b and d, 2 a &b, 3 a-e, 4, 7 a-d and 8. This work is due Tuesday and you should really get it finished by the end of class today. You can find topographic maps of Medicine Hat on Google Maps (Type in Medicine Hat Alberta on a Google search and click on maps at the top and then choose "Terrain" as an option). For other maps and information on Medicine Hat that will help you with some of the topographic map assignment questions check out Tourism Medicine Hat

Tuesday, April 16, 2019

Wednesday, April 17. 2019

Today's schedule is BADC-L

9:05 am – 10:05 am Block - B
10:10 am – 11:10 am Block- A
11:10 am – 12:00 pm Lunch Break
12:00 pm – 1:00 pm Block - D
1:05 pm – 2:05 pm Block- C
2:05 pm – 3:15 pm Personalized Learning

B Block Human Geography - Today we are back in the library for your last day to work on your information graphic poster on an endangered language. Remember, for your endangered language you’ll need to:
  1. Show where the endangered language originated and diffused to (yes on a map).
  2. Show the connection to the family, branch, and group of the endangered language. (Use your best judgment on this). 
  3. Show where the language is spoken today, indicate how many people speak it.
  4. Show Unique features of this endangered language (What makes it different to and similar than others?)
  5. Show examples of how the language is written and or spoken 
  6. Show why your endangered language is important to save
  7. Show how your endangered language is both being threatened (contributing factors) and being saved
  8. Show how people can find more info (links...sources cited)
See me if you need help or assistance. This project is due a week from today - email me your digital infoposter.


A Block Physical Geography - Today we are working on the Medicine Hat Topographic map. You need your Canadian Landscape topographic map book and the Medicine Hat map can be found on pages 40-42. You will need to work on questions 1 a, b and d, 2 a & b, 3 a-e, 4, 7 a-d and 8. This work is due on Tuesday and if you wish to work on this activity out of the class (and really who wouldn't?) I would highly suggest you ask me questions ahead of time. You can find topographic maps of Medicine Hat on Google Maps (Type in Medicine Hat Alberta on a Google search and click on maps at the top and then choose "Terrain" as an option). Do not forget that you have a unit final test next Tuesday (look at the blog  for the review). Please take all of your marked/corrected work out of the bin in the class and spend some time preparing. Good Luck. Thanks DKay Creative Productions for the vid of the Hat below



D Block Law - Today we are back in the library for our last day to work on our Canadian Criminal Defense project. Don't forget that you need to find two recent (in the last two years) criminal cases where a defense we discussed this past week was used. The defenses are: Alibi, Non-Insane Automatism, Intoxication, Insane Automatism, Battered Woman Syndrome, Self-defense, Necessity, Duress, Ignorance of the law, Mistake of fact, Entrapment, Double jeopardy, and Provocation. Places to find cases - CanLII is a non-profit organization managed by the Federation of Law Societies of Canada. CanLII's goal is to make Canadian law accessible for free on the Internet. Click through the databases on the side (provinces and territories) and search by year (2012-2011-2010)...anytime you see Supreme/Superior court or court of Queen's Bench you'll find serious criminal cases (remember look for R. v. in the case citation). You may also look at The Courts of British Columbia JudgmentsOntario Superior Court of Justice Judgments (you can find a link to all provinces' and territories' courts here)

C Block Criminology - Today you'll have the first part of class to finish your organized crime/gangs in Canada poster/fact sheet that you worked on in groups yesterday. We'll present these to the class today (volunteers not voluntolds). After we'll watch a History Channel show called Gangland. The episode I'd like to show you is from season three and it's called "To Torture or to Kill". This episode is about "Los Zetas" and the drug corridor along the Nuevo Laredo - Texas border. Miguel Treviño Morales, alias "Z-40," the leader of Los Zetas was captured an arrested in July 2013 however los Zetas still survive (as does Sinaloa and others).
Economist - Mexican Drug War
InSight Crime Los Zetas
CNN Mexican "Drug War" fast facts
National Post Los Zetas Trevino Morales

You can watch the Gangland documentary in class, on the link here or watch it below...


Monday, April 15, 2019

Tuesday, April 16. 2019

Today's schedule is CDAB

C Block Criminology - Today we'll look at gangs and gang activity in Canada. Your job will be to make a gang information poster about organized crime in Canada. In Triads (groups of three) you'll need to identify the gangs we have in Canada (aboriginal crime groups, cartels, ethnic crime groups, and outlaw motorcycle gangs) and explain the activities of each group: What do they do? How do they do it? What do they control? Where are they based in Canada?

Organized crime by nature (according to Howard Abadinsky) is monopolistic - in other words organized crime groups want to have a monopoly over a specific geographic area for the illicit activity they wish to pursue. (Note: use the section in your text to help as well). For more stories about organized crime (especially a particularly interesting court case in Ontario and Manitoba involving the Bandidos) see:

Organized Crime Agency of British Columbia (OCABC)
Organized Crime - Vancouver Sun
Preventing Organized Crime - Government of Canada
Canada's gang hotspots — are you in one?
Hells Angels Under Pressure
The Aboriginal Gangs of Winnipeg
Girls and Gangland
8 Brutal & Violent Canadian Gangs You Never Knew Existed
Organized Crime in Canada - RCMP
Organized Crime in Canada - CISC
Youth gangs in Canada: What do we know?
The Nature of Canadian Urban Gangs (look @ section 2.1 - Definitions)
Public Safety Canada - Organized Crime Research
CBC News: Biker Gangs in Canada
Prime Time Crime: Gangs in Canada

A good video of the article from Vice above is:
D Block Law - Today we are back in the library for our next day to work on our Canadian Criminal Defense project. Don't forget that you need to find two recent (in the last three years) criminal cases where a defense we discussed this past week was used. The defenses are: Alibi, Non-Insane Automatism, Intoxication, Insane Automatism, Battered Woman Syndrome, Self-defense, Necessity, Duress, Ignorance of the law, Mistake of fact, Entrapment, Double jeopardy, and Provocation. Places to find cases - CanLII is a non-profit organization managed by the Federation of Law Societies of Canada. CanLII's goal is to make Canadian law accessible for free on the Internet. Click through the databases on the side (provinces and territories) and search by year (2012-2011-2010)...anytime you see Supreme/Superior court or court of Queen's Bench you'll find serious criminal cases (remember look for R. v. in the case citation). You may also look at The Courts of British Columbia JudgmentsOntario Superior Court of Justice Judgments (you can find a link to all provinces' and territories' courts here)

A Block Physical Geography - Okay so I get it when you think about deserts normally this comes to mind:

Those cartoon backgrounds were inspired by this:


Today we will look at deserts and desert environments. We'll see the different types of deserts. I'll show you the Namib desert and the Skeleton Coast and then you'll define alluvial fan, playa, yardang, and sand dune. You'll have a question on desertification and there are some good websites to help. For desertification watch this:


 For the websites look here:

United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification
USGS Desertification page
Green Facts Scientific page on Desertification


Great Sand Dune National Park Colorado, U.S.A.

Do you know what used to be under the Saharan desert sands? Nope not candy. Check out the image and article on Smithsonian about ancient riverbeds below the Saharan sands  (or IFL Science here or Ecowatch here). And you could watch this fascinatingly poor dub of an article on a really good video about the sub Saharan river systems:

B Block Human Geography - We are back in the library working on a language project. Don't forget, your job will be to create an information graphic poster on an endangered language. For your endangered language you’ll need to:
  1. Show where the endangered language originated and diffused to (yes on a map).
  2. Show the connection to the family, branch, and group of the endangered language. (Use your best judgment on this). 
  3. Show where the language is spoken today, indicate how many people speak it.
  4. Show Unique features of this endangered language (What makes it different to and similar than others?)
  5. Show examples of how the language is written and or spoken 
  6. Show why your endangered language is important to save
  7. Show how your endangered language is both being threatened (contributing factors) and being saved
  8. Show how people can find more info (links...sources cited)







What can your poster look like? Here are some stock vector examples for layout ideas
And then you could use this Spanish language infoposter as a guide as well