Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Wednesday, June 20. 2018

Today's schedule is B-A-D-C-Flex

B Block 9:00 – 10:00
AG 10:05 – 10:15
A Block 10:20 – 11:20
Lunch 11:20 – 12:00
D Block 12:05 – 1:05
C Block 1:10 – 2:10
Personalized Learning 2:10 – 3:15

B Block Introduction to Law 10 - Today we are back in the library for our last project of the year...your Fairy Tale Criminal Code Case Study. Remember, you are a court reporter at a criminal trial involving a fairy tale. Your job during the case is to accurately report the case to your readers. Your story will summarize the events leading to the trial (the story), what the person is being charged with, who testified and to what for the Crown, who testified and to what for the defense including what was the basis for their defense, and finally what the judge’s decision was and why.

A Block Law 12 - Exam day #1...Multiple Selection, True/False, and Matching...tomorrow Case Study/Problem Solving. If you came prepared, I am certain that you will have done well...No problems! You've shown me that you can think like a lawyer so I have no doubt that you'll succeed on the test.

D Block Human Geography 11 - Exam day #1...Short Answer/Problem Solving...tomorrow Multiple Selection and True/False. If you came prepared, I am certain that you will have done well...No problems!

C Block Criminology 12 - Yesterday we talked about the tropes of: "Police are Useless"; "The Only One"; and "Bad Cop/Incompetent Cop". In yesterday's episode of Lie to Me, called "Moral Waiver", Dr. Cal Lightman and Ria Torres investigate the case of a female soldier who claims to be the victim of sexual assault by her commanding officer. At the same time, Dr. Gillian Foster and Eli Loker work on the case of a college basketball player who is accused of accepting a bribe from his university. In both cases the Lightman group employees are experts who are hired by authority figures (the US Army or a University Ombudsman) to do the work that they themselves can't quite get done...notice any tropes/themes here?

Today let's continue. We'll watch an episode of Elementary from season one called "The Deductionist". From IMDb.com:

A convicted killer who is supposed to donate a kidney to his sister ends up killing the surgical staff before escaping. Holmes is forced to work with a profiler (whom he can't stand) because she supposedly can predict what he will do next. 

The "Great Detective" trope is based on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes. In this version (Elementary), Sherlock Holmes was a consultant for Scotland Yard in England, before "hitting bottom" and ending up in rehabilitation. Joan Watson has been hired by Holmes' father to be his sober companion, to help him adjust from rehab back to everyday life. Holmes has come up with an interesting post-rehab regimen to keep himself busy-resuming his role as a consultant, this time for the New York police. Watson finds herself coming along for the ride. Of course the BBC did a modern version where Sherlock (Benedict Cumberbatch) solves crimes through sheer intellect and his Sherlock Scan, but is a (self-proclaimed) "high-functioning sociopath" barely kept in check by his friend Dr. John Watson (Martin Freeman).

In both modern versions Holmes has what can only be described as high functioning personality disorders but supreme intellect that assuredly saves the day for the police who clearly can't do their job properly without his help. Hmmm...sound familiar? Remember Dr. Cal Lightman in Lie to Me? 

In Elementary, following the tradition of depictions of Sherlock, his brain literally seems to work differently than other people. He has a lot of common personality traits with Asperger Syndrome - socially awkward and extremely gifted within a certain area (in his case detective work), straightforward and with a lot of brutal honesty, often oblivious to others' feelings but not lacking in empathy. He also has certain physical tics like the way he stands hunched in on himself sometimes, his jerking head movements and the way he grips his hands which are also consistent with someone who has Aspergers or Autism. So he's an insufferably awkward loner of a genius who is "the Only One" who can help the NYPD because "Police are Useless".

Monday, June 18, 2018

Tuesday, June 19. 2018

Today's Assembly schedule is C-D-Assembly-A-B

C Block  9:00-10:00 AM
Ag 10:05-10:15 AM
D Block 10:20-11:20 AM
Assembly 11:25-12:25 PM
Lunch 12:25-1:05 PM
A Block 1:10-2:10 PM
B Block 2:15-3:15 PM

C Block Criminology 12 - What are Crime Themes or Tropes? From TVTropes:
Tropes are devices and conventions that a writer can reasonably rely on as being present in the audience members' minds and expectations. On the whole, tropes are not clichés. The word clichéd means "stereotyped and trite." In other words, dull and uninteresting. Tropes transcend television. They reflect life. Since a lot of art, especially the popular arts, does its best to reflect life, tropes are likely to show up everywhere.
So this week I want you to consider being a critical viewer of crime media. I will show you two US crime serials in class: Lie to Me and the Mentalist (if there was time I'd also show you Elementary, Person of Interest, White Collar and Castle too but we don't really have time). I want you to examine these shows through the tropes of: "Police are Useless"; "The Only One"; and "Bad Cop/Incompetent Cop". Again from TVTropes:

Unlike just one Dirty Cop, or a small group of them, Bad Cop/Incompetent Cop describes an entire precinct (or world!) where police are monolithically terrible. Maybe they're all corrupt. Maybe just a few are corrupt, but the rest are so incompetent that they completely ignore the swath of abuse, violence, and destruction the corrupt cops leave. Maybe they're all just completely insane. When this is more of an Implied Trope due to the fact that nobody bothers to involve the police in anything, you have Police Are Useless.

Whenever someone in film or on TV reports a murder, or a monster, or a stalker or whatever, the police come as close to ignoring them as procedure (and the local captain) will allow. And that's if the report is from a respected professional; if they're an Agent Mulder, or worse yet, a teenager, the cops might try to pin charges on them! In addition to police, this trope also covers the military, security guards, and other people whose job is to protect others. So...

There's a crisis, and our beloved protagonists are the only people who can handle the problem. Unfortunately, this is because all the other people who could take care of it are woefully incompetent. If the series is about a local police force, the FBI are ivory-tower glory hounds. If the series is about an FBI agent, the local police are all useless Corrupt Hick types. If the series is about the military, government higher-ups will only be interested in pleasing the voters. If the series is about the government or an anti-military type, then the military will be The Evil Army commanded by a General Ripper type who is just itching to Nuke 'em back to the stone age, never mind the asking questions part. If the series is about a rogue hero, all levels of government and law enforcement, plus the military, are either corrupt or clueless, with the possible exception of a Reasonable Authority Figure who will still be unable to help because of mountains of red tape. And everyone else will just think that it isn't for them to deal with (In those cases where the people who are supposed to be handling the situation are not also bad guys).The Useless or Incompetent cop/police will need outside help "the only one" who becomes "the great detective"
A staple of Mystery Fiction and Detective Fiction, the Great Detective relies on powers of deduction and educated thought to solve crimes. The Great Detective is usually an Amateur Sleuth or a Private Detective (because Police Are Useless). Some of these detectives will have an Arch-Enemy that will be their equal, but in a different light.
So think about messages about detective "experts" and what these shows say about the public's view of modern police forces.


Today we'll watch an episode of Lie to Me, called "Moral Waiver". Dr. Cal Lightman and Ria Torres investigate the case of a female soldier who claims to be the victim of sexual assault by her commanding officer. At the same time, Dr. Gillian Foster and Eli Loker work on the case of a college basketball player who is accused of accepting a bribe from his university. In both cases the Lightman group employees are experts who are hired by authority figures (the US Army or a University Ombudsman) to do the work that they themselves can't quite get done...see if you can notice any tropes/themes here.

D Block Human Geography 11 -  Today we'll continue with our look at the Key Issue, "Why Do Cities Face Challenges"? Again, our focus will be on the division between the downtown CBD and the suburban residential neighbourhoods...using Vancouver as an example. We'll look at "filtering" (and SROs in Vancouver), public housing, gentrification and the Downtown Eastside (DTES).


A Block Law 12 - Exam prep day. We'll decide what you want to write tomorrow (MC/TF or Written). I don't want to heap on the pressure here but it's coming down to the wire right? Your major project is due this Thursday...so it's nose to the grindstone time; pound out the work and do the best that you can. Good Luck.

B Block Introduction to Law 10 - Today we'll go to the learning commons/library so you may start working on our last project of the year...your Fairy Tale Criminal Code Case Study. Many thanks to Mr. Scott McKillop of Winston Knoll Collegiate in Saskatchewan and Ms. Sarah Curry (currently in Toronto, Ontario) for the idea and the "bones" of this assignment.

Fairy tales are among the most violent and chilling tales in storytelling. While modern tales often have a happy ending, historically, older tales were full of elves, goblins, witches and magic, often resulting in violent endings. The Grimm brothers Jacob and Wilhelm are possibly the most famous publishers of fairy tales. In 1802, Jacob went to university to study law at the University of Marburg. As always, his little brother followed him, and entered law school in 1803. So the Grimm fairy tales come from two German lawyers so this makes them perfect for a criminal law analysis!

You are a court reporter at a criminal trial involving a fairy tale. Your job during the case is to accurately report the case to your readers. Your story will summarize the events leading to the trial (the story), what the person is being charged with, who testified and to what for the Crown, who testified and to what for the defense including what was the basis for their defense, and finally what the judge’s decision was and why.

Required items:
  1. Summary of the facts – Summarize the fairy tale that you are using.
  2. Crown’s case – Lawyer’s opening statement which includes what the defendant is being charged with (Use the criminal code and/or your textbook to find the offence and record the Section and the number), what penalty they are asking for, and who testified (Minimum of three (3) witnesses including the victim assuming they are alive) along with testimony of each witness.
  3. Defense’s case – Lawyer’s opening statement including what is his/her client’s defense will be and who will be testifying (Minimum of three (3) witnesses including the defendant) along with the testimony of each witness
  4. The judge's decision - Is the defendant guilty as charged? guilty of a lesser offense? or not guilty at all? What sentence will be given if necessary (the Criminal Code outlines minimum and maximum sentences)? Give the reasons for the decision made, why did the judge make the decision that they did?
For a really good example, Check out: Appleman Law Hansel & Gretel, Appleman Law Little Red Riding Hood, Appleman Law Goldilocks and the Three Bears  or Hansel and Gretel a Lawyer's Fairy Tale by the Legal Geeks.

Grimm Fairy Tales
Anderson Fairy Tales
Classic Fairy Tales
Another page of Grimm tales
Another page of Anderson tales

Sunday, June 17, 2018

Monday, June 18. 2018

Today's schedule is A-B-C-D

A Block Law 12 - Today I have the library/learning commons booked for you to continue your work on the major civil law project that is due this Thursday; that means THREE (3) days from now.

B Block Introduction to Law 10 - Quiz day! Today you'll have your final test/quiz (you may use your notes) and after you'll have some time to work on Wednesday's questions 1 & 2 from page 133 along with 10 & 11 from page 134 of the All About Law text

C Block Criminology 12 - You have the block today in the library to catch up on all of your work including your media monitoring project that is due this week. Don't forget Your task will be to watch, read, investigate and then report on 10 days, episodes, entries, or instances of media coverage of crime.

If you are reviewing a daily news source(s) you should include a full listing of the number of crimes covered by category (e.g. murder, robbery, rape, property crimes, white-collar crime, computer crime, government deviance, etc.), along with specific details on "high profile" stories. For fictional sources, you might want to choose a theme or crime type, and then pick examples of the media source that features it. For example, serial crime, white-collar crime, street crime, drug crime, crime inside prisons, police deviance, sex crimes, psychopathology, war-related crime, terrorism, computer crime, hacking, family violence, school crime, etc. would make good topics. If your media source is movies, then locate a set of films that all focus on that type of crime.

So what do you need to report on? You need to become an expert on one type of crime media. You`ll need to give an overview of what it is along with what it shows. Describe what crimes were shown or reported including as much criminological information (type of crime and why it was perpetrated) and sociological information (age, gender, race, ethnicity, class) about victims and perpetrators as you can find.

D Block Human Geography 11 - Today we'll look at the Key Issue, "Why Do Cities Face Challenges"? Our focus will be on the division between the downtown CBD and the suburban residential neighbourhoods...using Vancouver as an example. We'll look at "filtering" (and SROs in Vancouver), public housing, gentrification and the Downtown Eastside (DTES). For help with your questions look at the following sites and videos:
The people of the Downtown Eastside
Vancouver's Downtown Eastside changing with development
City of Vancouver Downtown Eastside Plan
Welcome to Hell: A walk through the Downtown Eastside
Vice: Downtown Eastside



Wednesday, June 13, 2018

Thursday, June 14. 2018

Today's schedule is D-C-B-A

D Block Human Geography 11 - Today we'll look at the Key Issue "Why Are Urban Areas Expanding"? We'll understand urban areas, census metropolitan areas, annexation, sub-urbanization, sprawl, smart growth and transportation into and out of city cores.



You have some questions to answer for me:

  1. What is required before an area can be annexed by a city?
  2. In the past, why did peripheral areas desire annexation?
  3. What has changed?
  4. What is meant by the statement: the “periphery of U.S. cities looks like Swiss cheese”?
  5. What has prevented the peripheries of European cities from looking like Swiss cheese?
  6. What is smart growth?
  7. List four ways demand for congested roads is being reduced
  8. List four ways in which public transportation is better than an automobile.
C Block Criminology 12 - Today we'll watch the fictionalized version of the Russell Williams case from Law & Order: Los Angeles "Silver Lake". This episode aired on April 16, 2011...that's 6 months after Russell Williams plead guilty. To film a television show (like a 1 hour drama police procedural) takes anywhere between six to eight days. A day normally begins at 6am and runs 11 to 13 hours long. It takes between 60 and 96 hours to produce 44 minutes of program content (for a 60 minute television show). That's just filming - don't forget script writing, set construction and post production work too so NBC "ripped from the headlines" the Russell Williams story literally as it was happening. If you think that's fast consider that NBC's Dateline aired "Conduct Unbecoming" on Friday, February 18, 2011 (4 months after his guilty plea) and CBS aired the 48 Hours episode "Name, Rank, Serial Killer?", the one that we watched yesterday, on April 9th, 2011 (the L&O:LA episode aired one week later!).

So we'll watch the episode and then I have two questions for you to answer (from yesterday):
  1. Do you think the news coverage of Col. Russell Williams' sentencing was too sensational? Do you think the court was right to release so much information and that the Canadian press were right to publish it all, or do you think that there is such a thing as too much information, and that there are some details we really don’t need to know?
  2. How did the Canadian and American coverage of the Russell Williams case differ? Use the the 48 Hours episode "Name, Rank & Serial Killer?" as well as the Fifth Estate episode "Above Suspicion" as your sources of information.




B Block Introduction to Law 10 - Today you'll have some time to work on yesterday's questions 1 & 2 from page 133 along with 10 & 11 from page 134 of the All About Law text, After a bit we'll watch an episode of Law & Order from Season 20 called "Innocence" where Detectives Lupo and Bernard detain a man who is tried and found guilty of killing a LGBTQ+ man as a hate crime. Shortly after, one of Assistant District Attorney Cutter's former law professors, Emily Ryan, steps in with The Innocence Collective determined to prove his innocence and reverse the verdict.

A Block Law 12 - Today I have the library/learning commons booked for you to continue your work on the major civil law project that is due two weeks from today. Including today you have Three (3) library blocks left to finish this assignment...no pressure really. And don't forget if you're choosing to do three cases with a video for your law firm...you had better start script writing and planning your production dates ASAP

Tuesday, June 12, 2018

Wednesday, June 13. 2018

Today's schedule is B-A-D-C-Flex

B Block 9:00 – 10:00
AG 10:05 – 10:15
A Block 10:20 – 11:20
Lunch 11:20 – 12:00
D Block 12:05 – 1:05
C Block 1:10 – 2:10
Personalized Learning 2:10 – 3:15

B Block Introduction to Law 10 - Today we'll look at the advantages of trial by jury and understand the methods and challenges to jury selection. After we'll focus on the presentation of evidence (Crown first then Defence), the rules of evidence (including voire dire), and types of evidence (circumstantial, hearsay, privileged, and character). I'll have you finish your work on questions 1, 3, 4, and 5 on page 90 and questions 1, 2, 3, 4, & 5 on page 97 of your All About Law text. You can then work on questions 1 & 2 from page 133 along with 10 & 11 from page 134 of the All About Law text. For more on juries in BC check out Justice BC - What is Jury Duty?

A Block Law 12 - Today I have the library/learning commons booked for you to continue your work on the major civil law project that is due two weeks from today. Including today you have Four (4) library blocks left to finish this assignment...no pressure really. And don't forget if you're choosing to do three cases with a video for your law firm...you had better start script writing and planning your production dates ASAP

D Block Human Geography 11 - Today we'll look at Latin American city models and discuss the "elite spine" and squatter settlements.




You have some questions to complete for me:
  1. Describe the elite spine sector developed in Latin American cities.
  2. What are the causes of squatter settlement?
  3. Define squatter settlements.
  4. Describe services and amenities in a typical squatter settlement.
  5. Cities in Africa, Asia and Latin America resemble European cities in their structure.  This is not a coincidence because….
  6. Draw and label a sketch of a “pre-colonial city”
C Block Criminology 12 - Today we'll continue our look at the Russell Williams case from 2010. Yesterday in class we watched the CBC Fifth Estate documentary "Above Suspicion" on the case and it reflected the Canadian coverage of the case. Today we'll look at the American coverage of the case, specifically the CBS 48 Hours Hard Evidence documentary: "Name, Rank, Serial Killer" and/or the NBC Dateline documentary "Conduct Unbecoming". We'll look at the "Cross Border Crime Stories" handout I gave you and after watching the episode perhaps you'll have a better grasp on the differences between our two legal cultures when it comes to crime coverage in the media. The biggest difference is the limitations on what can be reported about criminal prosecutions. Consider the differences in what was reported and how it was reported.


Remember Schadenfreude? Russell Williams was a heavy weight in the Canadian military. He was a powerful person who "fell from grace" which is part of what made his murders of Marie France Comeau and Jessica Lloyd a "newsworthy" crime story.

I have two questions for you to answer:
  1. How did the Canadian and American coverage of the Russell Williams case differ? Use the NBC Dateline episode "Conduct Unbecoming" as well as the Fifth Estate episode "Above Suspicion" as your sources of information.
  2. Do you think the news coverage of Col. Russell Williams' sentencing was too sensational? Do you think the court was right to release so much information and that the Canadian press were right to publish it all, or do you think that there is such a thing as too much information, and that there are some details we really don’t need to know? (Watch the following CBC story to help...