Friday, February 24, 2017

Friday, February 24. 2017

It's another Flex Friday...so AG first, make a plan and then go get after it.

In 611 I'll be available for help with your:


  1. Human Rights campaign posters for Law
  2. Your Psychology of a Serial Killer poster for Introduction to Law
  3. Your Political Party Webquest for Social Studies 11
  4. Your work on victims of crime for Criminology 12

Serial Killer Psychology Law 9/10

Human Rights Law 12

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Thursday, February 23. 2017

Today's schedule is D-C-B-A

D Block Criminology 12 - Today we'll watch the Law & Order: Special Victim's Unit episode "Closure" This episode deals with the short and long-term effects of a sexual assault on a victim.

From TV.com "Benson does her best to help a rape victim who is able to describe her attack in perfect detail, yet unable to properly identify her attacker when push comes to shove. When the detectives revisit the case a few months later, they find the woman even less willing to talk about what  happened, as she claims she has moved on."

I want you to think hard during this episode and pay careful attention to what happens with Harper's character as it will form a base for your blog entry on Monday.  After, use Chapter 3 pages 51-4 in CRIM textbook to help answer the following from yesterday:

1. Explain the impacts of crime on victims (both short and long term)
2. Do people bear some of the responsibility for their victimization if they maintain a lifestyle that contributes to the chances of becoming a crime victim? That is, should we “blame the victim”?

C Block Social Studies 11 -Today we're back in the library for our last day to look at voting and elections in Canada specifically focusing on political ideology and the parties that follow specific ideologies. A political ideology deals with goals (how society should work) and methods (how to reach the goals). We'll look at the major political parties in Canada: Liberal, Conservative, New Democratic, Green, and Bloc Quebecois. Well see what their platforms (goals and methods) were/are. Remember try to select a party that most represents your beliefs. You'll need to explain why you would choose that party if you were eligible to vote today. You will receive no more library/class time for this activity so try to use your time wisely today...I'll need this activity by tomorrow.


B Block Law 12 - To start the class we'll talk about equality and look at section 15 of the Charter. After that we'll look at the difference between prejudice and discrimination. We'll look at discrimination in Canada focusing on the Persons case and women's issues employment and pay equity, sexual harassment, and discrimination against pregnant women. I'll have you work on the following questions:

1. What are some of the current barriers to equality facing women?
2. What is pay equity?
3. How are different jobs compared under pay equity?
4. What is employment equity?
5. What groups are protected under employment equity laws?

After this we'll work on our Human Rights poster (due today). I have poster paper for you and I'll give you the paper once I've seen your ideas (a rough sketch). Remember you need to create a visually appealing Human Rights Campaign Poster that addresses the human rights violation by incorporating key information (What is happening? Where is it taking place? What rights are being violated? Who is having their rights violated? Why are their rights being violated?) as well as pictures, symbols, and colours. Your poster should seek to draw the attention of the public through the balanced combination of text and visuals in a creative, yet educational manner!

A Block Introduction to Law 9/10 - This is it...the last day for research or compilation. We have the library booked in order to continue work on our serial killer research activity which is due next Monday in class. If you have completed the research for this assignment then you can print off your work and start to assemble your poster (I have poster paper for you in the library). Either way...this is it so use your time wisely

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Wednesday, February 22. 2017

Today's schedule is B-A-D-C

B Block Law 12 - Today we'll finish sections 7 - 14 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms (legal rights section). I'll have you work on the following questions: page 54 q 1-3; page 56 q 1, 2 and 4; and page 60 question 1. After this we'll work on our Human Rights poster (which is due tomorrow). I have poster paper for you and I'll give you the paper once I've seen your ideas (a rough sketch). Remember you need to create a visually appealing Human Rights Campaign Poster that addresses the human rights violation by incorporating key information (What is happening? Where is it taking place? What rights are being violated? Who is having their rights violated? Why are their rights being violated?) as well as pictures, symbols, and colours. Your poster should seek to draw the attention of the public through the balanced combination of text and visuals in a creative, yet educational manner!

A Block Introduction to Law 9/10 - This is it...the last day for research or compilation. We have the library booked in order to continue work on our serial killer research activity which is due next Monday in class. If you have completed the research for this assignment then you can print off your work and start to assemble your poster. Either way...this is it so use your time wisely

D Block Criminology 12 - Today we'll continue our look at victims of crime and victimology. Criminologists now consider victims and victimization a major focus of study. About 7.6 million Canadians are victims of crime each year, and the social and economic costs of crime are in the billions of dollars. Like crime, victimization has stable patterns and trends. Violent crime victims tend to be young, poor, single males living in large cities, although victims come in all ages, sizes, races, and genders. Many victimizations occur in the home, and many victims are the target of relatives and loved ones. Today, use Chapter 3 pages 51-4 in CRIM textbook to help answer the following:.

1. Explain the impacts of crime on victims (both short and long term)
2. Do you agree with the assessment that for young people, a school is one of the most dangerous locations in the community? Did/Do you find G.P. Vanier to be a dangerous environment? Why/Why not?
3. Do people bear some of the responsibility for their victimization if they maintain a lifestyle that contributes to the chances of becoming a crime victim? That is, should we “blame the victim”?

To help with question three consider Manitoba Judge Robert Dewar, who in 2011, spared a convicted rapist jail time (2 year conditional sentence) because the victim sent signals that "sex was in the air" through her suggestive attire and promiscuous conduct. In January of the same year the Slut Walk  protest movement was sparked after a Toronto police officer told a personal security class at York University that women could avoid being sexually assaulted simply by not dressing like “sluts.”

For more on victim blaming see Huff Post

C Block Social Studies 11 - Today and tomorrow we'll be in the library trying to find information on political party platforms and making informed choices about which political party best fits your own set of beliefs through a Web Quest.

As a citizen of Canada you have the right and the responsibility to vote so, why should you vote? Leon Wieseltier wrote in his book "Insurrections of the Mind"...

"Here's why you have to think...an open democracy places an extraordinary intellectual responsibility on ordinary citizens because we are governed by what we think...we are governed by our opinions. So, the content of our opinions and the quality of our opinions basically determines the character of our society and that means a thoughtless citizen of a democracy is a delinquent citizen of democracy."

So an educated ordinary citizen means you should be aware of what political parties represent and stand for. Voting means making an educated critical decision in other words "thinking". You'll look at the major political parties in Canada: Liberal, Conservative, New Democratic, Green, and Bloc Quebecois. Well see what their platforms (goals and methods) were/are. When you look through the platforms and try to select a party that most represents your beliefs. You'll need to explain why you would choose that party if you were eligible to vote today. You will receive a Web Quest hand out to help organize your thoughts and research.

Monday, February 20, 2017

Tuesday, February 21. 2017

Today's schedule is C-D-A-B

C Block Social Studies 11 - Today we'll continue our discussion on the qualities of leadership. In essence I want you to think about people who you would follow and describe what makes a good leader. Try to avoid confusing leadership with success and popularity. You'll have time to work on the following questions:

1. What are your top five qualities of leadership? Explain them with examples to help.
2. How can leaders motivate people to follow them and get people to be involved in social issues?
3. What is the worst fault a leader can have? Why?
4. Can you be a good leader but not be a good communicator? Why or why not?
5. Why is it important to have a good leader as the Prime Minister of Canada?
6. Explain the “roles” (power) that the Prime Minister of Canada has to play

For help look at:
Prime Minister of Canada
The Prime Ministers of Canada
Fortune Magazine World's Greatest Leaders
Forbes Magazine Top 10 Qualities of Leadership
Foreign Policy Magazine 2015 Leading Global Thinkers

D Block Criminology 12 - Every day we have specific routines we engage in. Many of these routines are tailored to preventing us from becoming victims of crime. We do things like lock our doors, watch where we walk at night, or avoid walking alone. We take these actions because at some level we are afraid of the possibility of being a victim of crime. Despite taking these actions people often fall prey to crime in Canada. Today I'd like you to read through the "Nature of Victimization" on pages 53-5 and 57-58  and "Theories of Victimization" dealing with Victim Precipitation, Lifestyle, and Routine Activities on pages 59-62 in the CRIM text. After discussing these sections your job will be to complete the following:

1. Briefly outline and explain the patterns we've identified in victimization (social ecology, household, personal characteristics and repeat victimization)
2. Explain and compare the three theories of crime victimization (as a comparison chart or Venn diagram)

For more on victim assistance see:
BC Ministry of Justice Victims and Witnesses of Crime and Violence
Victim Link BC
National Office for Victims
Victim Services Corrections Canada
Canadian Resource Centre for Victims of Crime

There is a good CBC article here on the costs associated with victims of violent crime

A Block Introduction to Law 9/10 - Today we have the library booked in order to continue work on our serial killer research activity which is due next Monday in class. When you have completed the research for this assignment then you can print off your work and start to assemble your poster.

When looking for the typology of Serial Killers (for your assignment) consider the following excerpt from the book Serial Murder and the Psychology of Violent Crimes:

Serial Murder by Holmes, R. M., & DeBurger, J. E. (1988) identifies the following

1.Visionary Type—these murderers kill as a result of command hallucinations, delusions, or visions whose sources customarily include the forces of good or evil. These offenders are typically psychotic, leaving the crime scene in utter disarray. The homicides occur quickly with no extensive acts of torture. Frequently, the assailant relies on weapons of opportunity to commit his crimes and discards or locates the death instrument(s) in the victim’s body.

2. Mission-Oriented Type—the goal for these slayers is to kill certain types of people or to rid society of particular types of individuals. These serial murderers target victims based on their ethnicity, occupation (e.g., prostitutes), and/or age. Additionally, they determine whom to assail based on whether the person is deemed unworthy, undesirable, or somehow less than human. To illustrate, Jack the Ripper targeted prostitutes and viewed them as disposable. He dehumanized their bodies through mutilation in the process of killing them. In a letter written to the press by Jack the Ripper, he stated, “I am down on whores and shan’t quit ripping them.” Typically, the murders occur quickly and they are often planned. The mission-oriented offender does not engage in postmortem activities such as necrophilia or dismemberment and the weapon employed is not disposed of at the crime scene.

3. Hedonistic Type—these offenders murder as a result of sensation seeking or otherwise derive some sort of pleasure from their killings. Holmes and Holmes divided this type of assailant into two subcategories: the lust killer and the thrill killer. Both are summarily described below.

The lust killer murders principally for sexual gratification even if this does not entail traditional intercourse. However, sex or multiple sadistically erotic acts with a live victim are common. Sexually arousing behavior is the driving force for this offender, even after the person has killed the victim. Moreover, this attacker may also be sexually excited and/or satisfied from the murder itself. Ritualistic displays of sexual mutilation, facial disfigurement, cannibalism, body dismemberment, vampirism, and necrophilia are routinely featured in this type of homicidal act. The body is often concealed and the murder weapon taken. Close contact murder; specifically, beating or manual strangulation, are noted as most common.

The thrill killer murders for the visceral excitement the assailant experiences. However, once the victim is dead, the offender loses complete interest. As a result, the process of killing is prolonged as long as possible through extended acts of torture. The use of restraints and the presence of bite marks and burns on the victim’s body are characteristic behaviors for this type of slayer. Sadistic acts whose frequency is prolonged as long as possible prior to death, a concealed corpse, manual or ligature strangulation, and an animated victim during multiple sexual acts all characterize the patterns and motives of this type of assailant. manual or ligature strangulation, and an animated victim during multiple sexual acts all characterize the patterns and motives of this type of assailant.

4. Power/Control Oriented Type – these offenders harbor deep-seated feelings of inadequacy or attempt to compensate for a perceived lack of social or personal mastery over themselves by thoroughly dominating their victims. Holmes and DeBurger maintained that the primary motive for these offenders is not sexual in nature. Instead, these assailants desire complete and unfettered control over and subjugation of their powerless victims, including during the postmortem period. Consequently, torture, the use of restraints, strangulation, severed body parts, and decapitation are all routinely featured in these homicidal acts. A profound sense omnipotence – having the ultimate power of life or death over one’s victims as they cower and plead for their lives – fuels this type of serial killer. The act of murder is extended in order to increase the felt sense of gratification. The offender’s modus operandi is planned and organized, the body is concealed, and the weapon is absent.  

 B Block Law 12 - Today, we'll go through sections 7 - 14 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms (legal rights section). We'll look at two cases: Rodriguez v British Columbia (Attorney General), 1993 - which deals with Section 7 of the Charter (life, liberty and security of the person) and R. v. Tessling, 2004 - which deals with Section 8 of the Charter (search and seizure). For more information on the fight in Canada for the right to die on one's own terms look at the CBC In Depth site on the Sue Rodriguez case. In 2011, Gloria Taylor from Kelowna filed a case in B.C. Supreme Court to grant her the right to a doctor-assisted suicide. More info on this case can be found here After you have time to work on your Human Rights poster.

Sunday, February 19, 2017

Monday, February 20. 2017

Today's schedule is A-B-C-D

A Block Introduction to Law 9/10 - Today we have our first quiz in the class; you'll need no more than 20-25 minutes for it really. After the quiz, we'll venture off to the library to begin work on a small project about nasty people. It will be your job to create a poster on a serial killer.

INTRODUCTION TO LAW 9/10 SERIAL KILLER POSTER ASSIGNMENT
Select a criminal from the list below and discuss your selection with me to obtain approval to proceed with your research no later than Today. No more than two students may choose the same criminal and your selection of a criminal is on a first-come, first-served basis. Prepare a poster on your criminal that must include the following information:

1. Name of the criminal (including an image of them) along with any aliases they may have.
Summary (not details) of the crime(s) the criminal committed, with corresponding dates (year only) of the crimes.
2. Explain the type of victim that the criminal sought
3. Explain how the criminal was caught (by whom & how? What led to his/her capture?)
4. Indicate the criminal's background, childhood, method of committing the crime, and characteristics which cause the criminal to fit within the particular theory you selected.
5. State, define, and explain the criminological theory, (classical, biological, psychological, sociological, or integrated) which explains the criminal's behaviour
6. State which serial killer category the criminal is: mission-oriented, hedonistic, visionary, power/control, thrill killer, expedience killer; (and define whichever category you select)...More on this on tomorrow's blog entry

List:
Robert William Pickton
Clifford Olson
John Wayne Gacy
Ted Bundy
Dennis Rader (BTK)
David Berkowitz (Son of Sam)
Jeffrey Dahmer
Gary Ridgeway (Green River Killer)
Henry Lee Lucas & Otis Toole
Richard Ramirez (Night Stalker)
Aileen Wurnos
Dorothea Puente
Karla Homolka & Paul Bernardo
Genene Jones (Angel of Mercy)
Ed Gein
Angelo Buono & Kenneth Bianchi (Hillside Stranglers)
The Zodiac Killer
Robert Hansen
Wayne Williams
Edmund Emil Kemper III
Charles Ng & Leonard Lake
Coral Eugene Watts
Cary Stayner
John Allan Mohammad & Lee Boyd Malvo (Beltway Snipers)
Danny Rolling (Gainesville Ripper)
Joel Rifkin
Randy Kraft
Albert Fish
Kenneth Allan McDuff

Here are a few links to help you get started:
Biography: Serial Killers
How Stuff Works Serial Killer Web Site
Federal Bureau of Investigation Serial Killers site
All Serial Killers web site
Kari Sable serial killers site
Internet Crime Archives
Mind of a Killer
About.com Serial Killer web site
Mental Floss Female Serial Killer Web site 
Serial Killers

B Block Law 12 - Today I'll give you time to work on questions 1-4 of the Canada (Attorney General) v. JTI Macdonald Corp., (2007) case on page 44 in the text. This deals with whether limits imposed on tobacco manufacturers’ freedom of expression by provisions of Tobacco Act and Tobacco Products Information Regulations are justified (referring to Charter sections section 2.b Freedom of Expression and section 1 Reasonable Limits). I'd also like you to work on question 3 from page 46 which deals with the R. v. Keegstra (1990) and R. v. Butler (1992) cases. When we finish this you may work on your Human Rights poster (I have bristol board for you in the class).

C Block Social Studies 11 - Today I'd like to begin a discussion on the qualities of leadership. In essence I want you to think about people who you would follow and describe what makes a good leader. Try to avoid confusing leadership with success and popularity. So with a partner brainstorm a list of people who you think make good leaders and identify the qualities or traits of leadership that you admire or think are important. When we're finished going over your ideas work on the following questions:

1. What are your top five qualities of leadership? Explain them with examples to help.
2. How can leaders motivate people to follow them and get people to be involved in social issues?
3. What is the worst fault a leader can have? Why?
4. Can you be a good leader but not be a good communicator? Why or why not?
5. Why is it important to have a good leader as the Prime Minister of Canada?
6. Explain the “roles” (power) that the Prime Minister of Canada has to play

For help look at:
Prime Minister of Canada
The Prime Ministers of Canada
Fortune Magazine World's Greatest Leaders
Forbes Magazine Top 10 Qualities of Leadership
Foreign Policy Magazine 2015 Leading Global Thinkers


D Block Criminology 12 - Today your journal / blog entry is to answer the following:

Now that you know about trends in crime in relation to age, gender and class...Do you think that school is one of the most dangerous places for young people in society today? When you answer this question consider the following self-report survey...

Within the last 12 months have you:

  1. Stolen anything under ten dollars ($10) in value
  2. Stolen anything between ten ($10) to fifty ($50) dollars in value
  3. Stolen anything over fifty dollars ($50) in value
  4. Trespassed on private property
  5. Purposefully broken or damaged public or private property
  6. Purposefully spray painted “tagged” public or private property
  7. Deliberately set fire to something
  8. Forcibly entered a house or building
  9. Consumed any hallucinogenic drugs (marijuana, peyote, PCP “angel’s dust”, LSD “acid”)
  10. Consumed any stimulant drugs (methamphetamine, cocaine, crack)
  11. Consumed and depressant drugs (heroin, morphine, barbiturates)
  12. Been drunk in a public place while underage
  13. Bought or sold any drugs
  14. Driven a car that wasn’t yours without permission
  15. Violated the terms of your driving conditions (“N” OR “L”)
  16. Driven while under the influence of alcohol
  17. Been involved in a fist fight
  18. Hit someone with a weapon (stick, rock, bat)
  19. Verbally threatened someone with the intent to intimidate
  20. Held or detained someone against their will
  21. Been a victim of an unprovoked assault
  22. Had someone threaten to physically harm you
  23. Been a victim of sexual contact without your consent
  24. Had something stolen from you under ten dollars ($10) in value
  25. Had something stolen from you between ten ($10) to fifty ($50) dollars in value
  26. Had something stolen from you over fifty ($50) dollars in value
  27. Had any of your property damaged or broken
  28. Been a victim of discrimination and harassment on the basis of race, gender, or sexual orientation
  29. Known someone who has been the victim of a crime
Broaden your scope a little and do not necessarily focus on Vanier for this question. Think about other Canadian, British Columbian or Comox Valley high schools and generalize your response a bit. Don't forget that you'll need to find a story to back up your point of view here (either one about how little crime exists in schools or one that demonstrates that schools are somewhat dangerous places).