Sunday, March 26, 2017

Monday, March 27. 2017

Today's schedule is A-B-C-D

A Block Introduction to Law 9/10 - Today we will continue our look at criminal forensics by looking at how fingerprints are "lifted" at a crime scene (including what AFIS is), what the "Four T's" are for marks at a scene, how fibres are used, and what ballistics is. We'll practice a bit by getting fingerprinted. We will all get one set of fingers (and thumb) on one hand fingerprinted (our non dominant hand) by using graphite pencils and scotch tape. You will need to identify whether or not your prints are loops, arches, or whorls and then place them up on the blackboard. You will need to identify the total number of loops, arches, and whorls for each finger (and thumb) for the class (for everyone's sets of prints) and then graph the data. The graph is a comparative bar graph. For each finger (thumb, index, middle, ring & pinky) count up the total number of loops, arches, and whorls and graph that out next to each other

B Block Social Studies 11 - Today we will look at the four underlying causes of World War One - Militarism, Alliances, Imperialism, Nationalism (MAIN). You'll focus on imperialism (competing Empires on a global scale) and militarism, highlighted by the British naval escalation (HMS Dreadnought) and the massive arms development in Germany. After this you'll review the system of alliances (Triple Alliance / Triple Entente) and nationalism (Serbian "Black Hand" and Austria-Hungary control over the Balkans). To end, you'll look at the spark, Gavrillo Princip and the assassination of Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sofia.
 At the end of class today, you will need to work on questions 1 & 2 from page 24 along with question 2 from page 47 in the Counterpoints textbook.

C Block Law 12 - Today in Law we'll start looking at arrests and warrants in Canada. Our focus will be on the options police have if they believe a suspect has committed a crime. We'll talk about appearance notices & arrests (both warrantless and warrant arrests) and we'll also talk about the duties of police officers. From the All About Law textbook:

Police officers often have to make quick decisions to save lives - their own as well as others. They have to act reasonably because they are held responsible for their conduct and behaviour when carrying out their duties. If they break the rules of police conduct, their evidence may be refused, which can result in an acquittal. In rare situations, the officers involved can be charged under criminal law or sued under civil law (Murphy, Elliott, Mete and Glass; 2009)

This is relevant due to the 2014 lack of indictment by a grand jury in Ferguson, Missouri in the shooting death of Michael Brown. Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager, was killed by a white police officer, Darren Wilson, on August 9th, 2014. Lawyers for Brown's family say the teen was trying to surrender when he was shot, while Wilson's supporters say he feared for his life and opened fire in self-defense. Brown was shot at least six times. Brown was suspected of having stolen cigars from a nearby convenience store shortly before the incident. Brown and a friend had been walking down the middle of the street when Wilson approached them. The grand jury could have indicted Wilson on charges of manslaughter or murder, however they concluded there was not enough evidence to charge him.

We'll talk about the rights of police officers in connection to the Brown case and we'll work in partners on the R. v. Clayton (2007) case on page 156 and the R. v. Shankar (2007) case on page 159 in the All About Law text. After I'll have you work on questions 3 & 5 on page 149 and questions 2 & 4 on page 154 of the All About Law text.

D Block Criminology 12 - Today we are off to the library for our next blog assignment and I'd like you to tell me about auto theft. I'd like you to look up information on why people steal cars, where in Canada most cars are stolen from, what types of vehicles are most commonly stolen and I'd like you to tell me how much auto theft is actually happening in Canada (rates). Then I'd like you to tell me methods of protection (how to stop your car from being stolen). The Kanetix website below lists the top vehicles stolen in Canada and check out this article on the Macleans website for the article on the top 100 cities for auto theft in Canada. CTV News Vancouver has a short video on the top 10 most wanted auto theft suspects here and the Vancouver Sun did a nice piece on Auto Theft in the Lower Mainland (including interactive maps) here.

Crime Stoppers Bait Car website
Auto Theft Canada
Kanetix.ca Auto theft in Canada

Friday, March 17, 2017

Friday March 17, 2017

It's Flex Friday so AG first, make a plan for the day and then get at it. I will be available in 611 for assistance and help in all subjects. If you aren't here and I've missed you, enjoy your Spring Break. Rest up and rejuvenate. I'll see you after next week.

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Thursday, March 16. 2017

Today's schedule is D-C-B-A

D Block Criminology 12 - Okay, so we know where violence comes from. We know what homicide is, the divisions of murder and why people do it. We understand what sexual assault is, the typology of assault and the motives for doing it. Today I'll finish up the violence section with you by looking at abuse, domestic assault and terrorism. For terrorism consider the following:

By design, terrorist attacks are intended to have a psychological impact far outweighing the physical damage the attack causes. As their name suggests, they are meant to cause terror that amplifies the actual attack. A target population responding to a terrorist attack with panic and hysteria allows the perpetrators to obtain a maximum return on their physical effort. One way to mitigate the psychological impact of terrorism is to remove the mystique and hype associated with it. The first step in this demystification is recognizing that terrorism is a tactic used by a variety of actors and that it will not go away. Terrorism and, more broadly, violence are and will remain part of the human condition. The Chinese, for example, did not build the Great Wall to attract tourists, but to keep out marauding hordes. Fortunately, today's terrorists are far less dangerous to society than the Mongols were to Ming China.

For more on this read Keeping Terrorism in Perspective at Stratfor
For information on terrorism check out:
Terrorism Watch and Warning
DHS Preventing Terrorism
Global Terrorism Database
FBI Terrorism
Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada Terrorism
National Counterterrorism Center

I'll have you work on the following questions:
  1. Despite cultural awareness and various initiatives in schools and in the media, hate crimes continue to happen in significant numbers in Canada. Discuss the types of hate crimes most prevalent in Canada and the current responses to them. 
  2. Governments have tried numerous responses to terrorism. Discuss some of these responses. 
  3. It is unlikely that the threat of punishment can deter robbery; most robbers refuse to think about apprehension and punishment. Wright and Decker suggest that eliminating cash and relying on debit and credit cards may be the most productive method to reduce the incidence of robbery. Although this seems far-fetched, society is becoming progressively more cashless; it is now possible to buy both gas and groceries with credit cards. Would a cashless society end the threat of robbery, or would innovative robbers find new targets?
  4. Based on what you know about how robbers target victims, how can you better protect yourself from robbery? 

Today we'll watch an episode of Criminal Minds from Season 4..."Minimal Loss". In the episode two members of the BAU, Reid and Prentiss, are sent in undercover to investigate an alleged child abuse at an isolated property which is the home of a religious cult led by the charismatic Benjamin Cyrus. The real aim is to not only ascertain whether or not this is true, but also to look into the cult as a whole. The rest of the BAU, along with a plethora of other law enforcement agencies, are planning a raid on the compound, but when Cyrus gets wind of this, he imposes a lock down and unleashes a cache of weapons which make it pretty clear that he has no intention of being taken alive ... and the same goes for his 'loyal' followers as well.

There are echoes to Waco Texas and David Koresh, the leader of the Branch Davidians.

C Block Social Studies 11 - Today we'll take a look at the changes to the economy of Canada in the early 20th Century. We'll talk about advances in technology and the resource extraction economy. We'll talk about unions and the gap between wealth and poverty and you'll need to complete questions 1-3 on page 16.


B Block Law 12 - Today we're going to watch an episode of Law and Order from season 9 called True North. From tv.com...The double murder of a wealthy man and his daughter leads the detectives to the wife and stepmother of the deceased. However, Canada's objection to the death penalty hampers McCoy and Carmichael in seeking crucial evidence for obtaining a conviction.
We'll discuss the episode after its conclusion.

A Block Introduction to Law 9/10 - Today we will watch the CSI episode "Burden of Proof" (Season 2 Episode 215). This ties into your "Clue Us In" crime scene reconstruction project. There are many important things to notice in this episode but the one thing that I'd like you to remember is that forensics can't solve every case and that the forensic analysis of crime scenes is a tedious, slow meticulous and process.

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Wednesday, March 15. 2017

Today's schedule is B-A-D-C

B Block Law 12 - Today we'll have time to finish up yesterday's work on the court level scenarios and the questions from page 138. After, if there's time, we'll start looking at arrests and warrants in Canada. Our focus will be on the options police have if they believe a suspect has committed a crime. We'll talk about appearance notices & arrests (both warrant-less and warrant arrests) and we'll also talk about the duties of police officers.

A Block Introduction to Law 9/10 -  I have the library booked so that you may work on the Clue Us In crime scene investigation project. Please note that your library time is coming to a close, today is the last day I have for you in the library, so please don't waste time. Remember you need to create a crime...replicate the crime scene...investigate the crime as if you were an R.C.M.P. officer...and prepare a dossier file to hand over to Crown Counsel so that they may prosecute the case.

D Block Criminology 12 - Don't forget, I'd like you to:

Explain the types of serial and mass murderer along with the reasons why they commit these crime

To better understand the people that commit heinous acts of murder, we'll take some more time to understand what a "psychopath" is...specifically a Charismatic Psychopath: charming, attractive liars; gifted at some talent, using it to their advantage in manipulating others; verbally facile fast-talkers who easily persuade others out of everything they own, even their lives.

NOTE: The DSM-V which is the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders doesn't have psychopath as a mental disorder...they have ASPD which is Anti-Social Personality Disorder which is diagnosed as:

A. There is a pervasive pattern of disregard for and violation of the rights of others occurring since age 15 years, as indicated by three (or more) of the following:
1. failure to conform to social norms with respect to lawful behaviors as indicated by repeatedly performing acts that are grounds for arrest
 2. deceitfulness, as indicated by repeated lying, use of aliases, or conning others for personal profit or pleasure
 3. impulsivity or failure to plan ahead
 4. irritability and aggressiveness, as indicated by repeated physical fights or assaults
 5. reckless disregard for safety of self or others
 6. consistent irresponsibility, as indicated by repeated failure to sustain consistent work behavior or honor financial obligations
 7. lack of remorse, as indicated by being indifferent to or rationalizing having hurt, mistreated, or stolen from another.

 B. The individual is at least age 18 years.
 C. There is evidence of conduct disorder with onset before age 15 years.
 D. The occurrence of antisocial behavior is not exclusively during the course of schizophrenia or a manic episode.

What is the difference between sociopathy and psychopathy (hot-headed vs. cold-hearted)?  

While both psychopathy and sociopathy are extreme forms of antisocial personality disorders, sociopathy is caused by social or environmental factors whereas psychopathic traits are more innate. From the Atlantic magazine...

In his landmark book on psychopathy, The Mask of Sanity, researcher Hervey Cleckley theorized that some people with the core attributes of psychopathy -- egocentricity, lack of remorse, superficial charm -- could be found in nearly every walk of life and at every level, including politics. Robert Hare, perhaps the leading expert on the disorder and the person who developed the most commonly used test for diagnosing psychopathy, has noted that psychopaths generally have a heightened need for power and prestige -- exactly the type of urges that make politics an attractive calling. In any event, the idea that a psychopath could reach the heights of power is nothing new.
Over a century ago, famed American philosopher and psychologist William James said, "When superior intellect and a psychopathic temperament coalesce [...] in the same individual, we have the best possible conditions for the kind of effective genius that gets into the biographical dictionaries." Perhaps, then, that's the key; it's the combination of other talents with certain elements of psychopathy that can make an effective leader.
Which leads us to today and again from The Atlantic "Is Donald Trump a Sociopath?" 


C Block Social Studies 11 - Today we'll take a look at the changes to the economy of Canada in the early 20th Century. We'll talk about advances in technology and the resource extraction economy. We'll talk about unions and the gap between wealth and poverty and you'll need to complete questions 1-3 on page 16.
 

Monday, March 13, 2017

Tuesday, March 14. 2017

Today's schedule is C-D-A-B

C Block Social Studies 11 - Today we are going to finish the Laurier Era work we started yesterday on attitudes and commonly held beliefs for Canadians in the Laurier Era (population of 5,301,000 British 58%, French 31% and Other 11% -Italian, Irish, Eastern European, First Nations, Japanese & Chinese). Simply put we were a predominantly White, British, Anglican, Rural, Labourer, Uneducated society. In addition we were a Dominion (in essence a colony) of the British Empire and as such were insular (inward looking – isolationist) and proud of it so there were challenges to the First Nations, African Canadian and Asian Canadian populations (not to mention the different ethnicities from Europe that weren't British too). For the remainder of the class we'll take a look at the changes to the economy of Canada in the early 20th Century. We'll talk about advances in technology and the resource extraction economy. We'll talk about unions and the gap between wealth and poverty. I'll need you to finish up yesterday's questions on assimilation of aboriginal culture, restrictions on Asian immigration, and fear over the changes to Canadian culture - which are questions 1-4 on page 13 (look through pages 9-12 in the Counterpoints textbook).

D Block Criminology 12 - Today we'll discuss murder and homicide. We'll discuss the divisions of murder in Canada (1st and 2nd degree and manslaughter), the extent of murder in Canada, and murderous relations (acquaintance and stranger homicide). After, we'll try to make sense of mass and serial murder and I'd like you to:

Explain the types of serial and mass murderer along with the reasons why they commit these crimes.

You can find the answers to this in the work of Jack Levin and James Alan Fox "Multiple Homicide: Patterns of Serial and Mass Murder". The summary of their work is on pages 209 and 210 of the textbook in the Criminological Enterprise section. For more info look at the work of John Douglas (former FBI profiler) on mindhunter.com (look in the article section and there is a great read entitled "So, you want to become a profiler..."). To better understand the people that commit heinous acts of murder, we'll also review what a "psychopath" is. Too often people throw the term psycho around without really understanding what it means so we'll look at Dr. Robert Hare's PCL-R (Psychopathy Checklist Revised). The diagnosis "Psychopath" is closely related to Antisocial Personality Disorder in the DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th Edition).

A Block Introduction to Law 9/10 - I have the library booked so that you may work on the Clue Us In crime scene investigation project. Pl;ease note that your library time is coming to a close so please don't waste time. Remember you need to create a crime...replicate the crime scene...investigate the crime as if you were an R.C.M.P. officer...and prepare a dossier file to hand over to Crown Counsel so that they may prosecute the case. It's due Friday...Good Luck. Check out the Crime Museum (Crime Library Forensic Science) website for sweet info


B Block Law 12 - Today I'll have you read through "Our Criminal Court System" from pages 134-136 and complete questions 1-5 on page 138. After, please read each scenario and determine what court would address the issue.

  1. A trial is taking place for a person who is charged with the summary conviction offence of pretending to practice witchcraft contrary to section 365 of the Criminal Code.
  2. An issue of national importance has been dealt with by the provincial supreme court and the provincial court of appeal. The party that lost at the court of appeal wants the issue reconsidered.
  3. A trial is being held about an intellectual property matter.
  4. The Crown thinks that a sentence given in the provincial supreme court for a person convicted of sexual assault is too lenient and is appealing the sentence.
  5. A person is charged with the indictable offence of aggravated assault and is having their preliminary hearing.
  6. A person is on trial for the indictable offence of impaired driving causing death.
  7. A person loses their copyright case and wants to have the decision reviewed by a higher court.
  8. A person was convicted of a summary conviction offence and is appealing the decision.
  9. The provincial court of appeal makes a decision. What courts are bound to follow that decision?
  10. In a split decision, the court of appeal affirms the conviction of a person charged with murder. The convicted individual wants the case considered by a higher court.

To end the class we'll watch an episode of Law & Order from Season 10 called "Sundown". In the episode, a patient is found beaten to death in a hospital lounge -- and the resulting case involves infidelity, Alzheimer's disease and a ladies' man. An interesting question arises here...does Alzheimer's disease eliminate the Mens Rea for a crime? Hmmmmmmmm....