Sunday, September 23, 2018

Monday, September 24. 2018

Today's schedule is ABCD

A & D Blocks Human Geography - Today we're back in the library looking at the 2018 World Population Data (using both the PRB Interactive Map and the pdf data sheet) to see current trends and numbers in world population. Today is your last day to work on the webquest with questions in your week 3 work package to answer. You may work with a partner to find answers to the 17 questions but you all need to record answers. Use:

2018 World Population Data Map
2018 World Population Datasheet

For the last question you'll need to choose one of the following demographic variables using the World Population Data Sheet and create a choropleth map showing the distribution of that indicator on a world outline map. The PRB World Population Data map is an example of a Choropleth Map. Use it to help you create yours, just select the indicator you wish to create and it will make a choropleth map that you can recreate.

Infant Mortality
Birth Rate
Death Rate
Total Fertility Rate
Life Expectancy

The instructions are in the week 3 package but feel free to ask me in class today; Good luck!

B Block Criminology - Today your journal / blog entry is to post your response to Friday's question:

What are the short and long term impacts on victims of Crime? Use both Harper from the Law & Order episode you watched on Friday and Chapter 3 pages 54-7 in CRIM textbook to help.

Next, I'd like you to find an article (news story) about a victim of crime and for that you should outline the impacts of the crime on them. Finally, using the two stories (one fictional and one real) explain what we should do to mitigate (soften the impact) the impacts of crime on victims (be realistic). Don't forget to find stories on crime in Canada check out:  CANOE CNews Crime site...or the Toronto Star Crime site...or  Global News Crime site...or the Huffington Post Canada Crime site...or the Vancouver Sun Crime Blog

Thursday, September 20, 2018

Friday, September 21. 2018

Today's schedule is BADC

B Block Criminology - Today you have time to complete yesterday's questions:

  • Briefly outline and explain the patterns we've identified in victimization (social ecology, household, personal characteristics and repeat victimization) 
  • Explain and compare the three theories of crime victimization 
Then, we'll watch the Law & Order: Special Victim's Unit episode "Closure" This episode deals with the short and long-term effects of a sexual assault on a victim.

From TV.com "Benson does her best to help a rape victim who is able to describe her attack in perfect detail, yet unable to properly identify her attacker when push comes to shove. When the detectives revisit the case a few months later, they find the woman even less willing to talk about what  happened, as she claims she has moved on."

I want you to think hard during this episode and pay careful attention to what happens with Harper's character as it will form a base for your blog entry on Monday.

Try to take notes and have a discussion on what the short and long term impacts the sexual assault had on the character Harper in the episode.


A & D Blocks Human Geography - Today and Monday we're in the library looking at the 2018 World Population Data (using both the PRB Interactive Map and the pdf data sheet) to see current trends and numbers in world population. You have a webquest with questions in your week 3 work package to answer. You may work with a partner to find answers to the 17 questions but you all need to record answers. Use:

2018 World Population Data Map
2018 World Population Datasheet

For the last question you'll need to choose one of the following demographic variables using the World Population Data Sheet and create a choropleth map showing the distribution of that indicator on a world outline map. The PRB World Population Data map is an example of a Choropleth Map. Use it to help you create yours, just select the indicator you wish to create and it will make a choropleth map that you can recreate.

Infant Mortality
Birth Rate
Death Rate
Total Fertility Rate
Life Expectancy

The instructions are in the week 3 package but feel free to ask me in class today or Monday. Good luck!

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Thursday, September 20. 2018

Today's schedule is DCBA

D & A Blocks Human Geography - Today's key question is "Why Does Population Growth Vary among Regions"? and it's kind of an important one to look at. Although population rates vary among countries, the model for a similar process of change in a society’s population is the demographic transition. So we'll look at the model...it looks like this:

I'll have you fill in the chart on the week three work package with characteristics describing each stage in the demographic transition model (CBR, CDR, NIR, etc.) along with the amount of growth of each stage (low, high, decreasing aka moderate) etc.

Consider Bulgaria. Bulgaria is projected to have the fastest-shrinking population in the world. It's already lost a fifth of its population since the 1990s. But what does this mean for those who remain? Bulgaria's dwindling population numbers happen in part because a lot of young adults have left the country so the birth rate is low but the Bulgarian government does not see immigration as a possible solution to the country's dwindling population. So...stage 4 (maybe 5) in the DTM. What should they do?

You'll also need to look at the ideas of Thomas Malthus (Malthusian theory)

I'll have you fill in a chart on the various theories of population growth and we end with this question:

Paul and Anne Ehrlich argue in The Population Explosion (1990) that a baby born in a developed country poses a greater threat to sustainability than a baby born in a developing country because people in developed countries place much higher demands on the world’s supply of energy, food, and other limited resources. Do you agree with this view? Why or Why not?

We'll also play around a bit on Gapminder to visualize these statistics

B Block Criminology - Today we will focus on the impact that crime has on victims. We'll try to examine the impacts of crime on victims (both short and long term)




I'll go over some notes with you on this and we'll try to understand how violence and violent crime (out next topic in the course) is a traumatic event that impacts human lives. I'd like you to read through the "Nature of Victimization" on pages 53-5 and 57-58  and "Theories of Victimization" dealing with Victim Precipitation, Lifestyle, and Routine Activities on pages 59-62 in the CRIM text. After discussing these sections your job will be to complete the following:

1. Briefly outline and explain the patterns we've identified in victimization (social ecology, household, personal characteristics and repeat victimization)
2. Explain and compare the three theories of crime victimization.

For more on victim assistance see:
BC Ministry of Justice Victims and Witnesses of Crime and Violence
Victim Link BC
National Office for Victims
Victim Services Corrections Canada
Canadian Resource Centre for Victims of Crime

There is a good CBC article here on the costs associated with victims of violent crime.

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Wednesday, September 19. 2019

Today's schedule is BADC

B Block Criminology - Today I'll have you work on three questions from yesterday about crime trends:
  1. Using pages 37 to 46 in the CRIM textbook outline and explain the crime patterns in relation to ecology, firearms, social class, age, gender and race.
  2. What is a chronic offender and what is the significance of Marvin Wolfgang's discovery (why is identifying the chronic offender important)?
  3. How would you explain the gender differences in the crime rate (why do you think males are more violent than females)? 
After a bit we'll talk about victims of crime. Every day we have specific routines we engage in. Many of these routines are tailored to preventing us from becoming victims of crime. We do things like lock our doors, watch where we walk at night, or avoid walking alone. We take these actions because at some level we are afraid of the possibility of being a victim of crime. Despite taking these actions people often fall prey to crime in Canada. So what do we know about victimization?

  1. Women were at higher risk than men of being victims of a violent crime
  2. Age was the key risk factor in violent victimization
  3. Drug use, binge drinking and the frequency of evening activities were associated with the risk of violent victimization
  4. Mental health was associated with the risk of violent victimization
  5. People who suffered child maltreatment were more likely to be victims of a violent crime
  6. People with a history of homelessness were more likely to report being a victim of a violent crime
  7. The risk of violent victimization was higher among people residing in a neighbourhood with low social cohesion
  8. Aboriginal people, in particular women, were more likely to be victims
  9. One-quarter of violent incidents took place at the victim’s place of work
  10. The majority of offenders were male and, on average, in their early thirties
  11. Most victims knew their attacker
  12. Most violent incidents did not involve weapons and did not result in physical injury
  13. Low social cohesion was associated with a higher risk of household victimization
  14. Households residing in apartments or condos were less likely to be victimized by household crime
  15. The size of the household was linked to the risk of victimization
  16. One incident in five resulted in losses of $1,000 or more
  17. Most incidents of victimization did not come to the attention of the police
A & D Blocks Human Geography - Today we'll try to answer the Key Question "Why Is Global Population Increasing"? Geographers most frequently measure population change in a country or the world as a whole through three measures -  crude birth rate, crude death rate, and natural increase rate and we'll look at those today along with measures of fertility and mortality along with population pyramids.


You'll have some questions to work on for me in order to understand our key concept:

  1. About how many people are being added to the world’s population each year?
  2. How does the TFR in your family compare to the overall figure for North America? 
  3. Match the Country with the population pyramid and explain why (Canada, Chad & Germany)
  4. Name a type of community that might have a lot more males than females. Why so?
We'll also play around a bit on Gapminder to visualize these statistics

Monday, September 17, 2018

Tuesday, September 18. 2018

Today's schedule is CDAB

D & A Block Human Geography - Today we'll look at the Key Question: Where Is the World’s Population Distributed? Human beings are not distributed uniformly across Earth’s surface. We can understand how population is distributed by examining two basic properties - concentration and density. Today we'll examine where populations are concentrated looking at the concept of ecumene. Lastly we'll look at density in terms of arithmetic, physiological and agricultural forms. You've got three questions to answer for me today:
  1.  Why isn’t North America one of the four major population clusters?
  2. On the map in the week 3 package...use the maps on page 47 to prepare a sketch map that shows non-ecumene and very sparsely inhabited lands (remember map basics!)
  3.  In terms of food supply, which combination of measures of density is most important when considering whether a country’s population is too large? Why?



The national agricultural ecumene includes all dissemination areas with 'significant' agricultural activity.

B Block Criminology - You now know that the crime data indicate that rates have declined significantly in the past few years and are now far less than they were a decade ago. One of the major suspected causes for the crime rate drop is the age structure of society; the number of young males in Canada is lower than before and the data sources show relatively stable patterns in the crime rate. Ecological patterns show that crime varies by season and by urban versus rural environment, however there is evidence of gender patterns in the crime rate: Men commit more crime than women. Age is one of the largest influences on crime; young people commit more crime than the elderly (and there are fewer young people in society). Crime data show that people commit less crime as they age, but the significance and cause of this pattern are still not completely understood.

Although police-reported crime in Canada (measured by the Crime Severity Index CSI) increased for the second year in a row in 2016, the national CSI increased only 1% but remained 29% lower than a decade earlier in 2006. Highlights of the Stats Can Report show:

  1. In 2016, the overall volume and severity of violent crime, as measured by the violent CSI, was virtually unchanged from the previous year.
  2. The overall volume and severity of non-violent crime, as measured by the non-violent CSI rose  2%  from the previous year (largely driven by increases in police-reported incidents of fraud).
  3. After notable increases in property offences in 2015, police-reported crime rates for all types of property crimes decreased or remained the same in 2016, with the exception of theft of $5,000 or under and total fraud. The rate of total fraud, which includes general fraud (+14%), identity fraud (+16%) and identity theft (+21%), was 14% higher than in 2015.
  4. Police-reported rates of cannabis-related drug offences declined for the fifth consecutive year in 2016. The rate of possession of cannabis declined 12% from 2015 
  5. The rate of impaired driving decreased by 3% in 2016 to 194 impaired driving incidents per 100,000 population, representing the fifth consecutive decline.

The slight increase in the national CSI between 2015 and 2016 was primarily driven by a continued increase in the rate of fraud (+14%). Increases in police-reported rates of administration of justice offences, sexual violations against children and child pornography were also reported. These increases were offset by fewer police-reported incidents of breaking and entering, mischief and robbery resulting in a slight increase to Canada’s CSI compared to 2015.
Between 2015 and 2016, 20 of 33 of Canada’s census metropolitan areas (CMAs) reported increases in their Crime Severity Index (CSI). Calgary, which had the largest increase in CSI in 2015 (+30%), reported a 6% decline in 2016 primarily driven by decreases in breaking and entering and robbery. Similarly, of the other four CMAs which had recorded the largest increase in 2015, Victoria (-12%), Abbotsford-Mission (-5%) and Moncton (-4%) also reported declines in their CSIs in 2016. In Edmonton, however, crime continued to increase (+3%) as a result of increases in theft of $5,000 or under and fraud.Regina (125.8) and Saskatoon (117.8) were the CMAs with the highest CSIs in 2016, as has been the case since 2010. Relatively high CSIs were recorded in Edmonton (105.7), Winnipeg (103.9), Kelowna (100.3), Vancouver (94.3) and Abbotsford-Mission (91.4). These seven CMAs also had the highest police-reported crime rates in 2016

 Today I'll have you work on three questions about crime trends:
  1. Using pages 37 to 46 in the CRIM textbook outline and explain the crime patterns in relation to ecology, firearms, social class, age, gender and race.
  2. What is a chronic offender and what is the significance of Marvin Wolfgang's discovery (why is identifying the chronic offender important)?
  3. How would you explain the gender differences in the crime rate (why do you think males are more violent than females)?