Thursday, April 27, 2017

Thursday, April 27. 2017

Today's schedule is D-C-B-A

D Block Introduction to Psychology 11 - Today I'll go over your Psychology Inquiry Project with you. Essentially, inquiry is the process of being puzzled about something, generating your own questions about the subject, using information to satisfy your own interests and to develop your knowledge. What does it include? Planning, Research, Focus, Creating, Sharing, Evaluating and Reflecting. Within the context of Psychology in order to start your inquiry process you'll need to ask/consider:

  • What is my broad area of inquiry?
  • How can I narrow down my focus...
  • Some possible inquiry questions are...
  • Where can I find reliable information sources?
  • Who will be the audience and what format will I make my presentation?
  • How will I be evaluated on this inquiry project?
We'll head to the library to work on our week 2 package and to begin the process of Inquiry for our project.

C Block Social Studies 11 - We are building upon Canada’s cultural identity!
Remember: After WW1 the world started to see Canada as it’s own autonomous country. Kind of like all of you as you build your identity from a child to an adolescent to an adult with your own ideas, styles and goals. As Emily Carr and the Group of Seven developed new painting styles that set Canada upon the art stage and built the symbol of Canada as a vast and wild wilderness of the north, motion pictures, radio dramas, music and sports simultaneously helped Canada to grow into an autonomous Country through cultural identity - think symbols! Some of the personalities and ideas that built up our cultural identity are

  1. Sports heroes: Lionel “Big Train” Conacher; Fanny “Bobby” Rosenfeld; and Tom Longboat
  2. Musicians and Actors/Actresses: Robert Nathaniel Dett; Fay Wray; and Mary Pickford
  3. Social Personalities and Inventors: Chief Joe CapilanoArchie Belaney “Grey Owl”Wilfrid “Wop” MayArmand Bombardier; and Sir Frederick Banting
  4. Feminist Politicians (As a Reminder): Agnes Macphail; and Emily Murphy 

B Block Law 12 - Test thingy Monday...you got a review yesterday right? Today you've got eh block to finish yesterday's work: explain the roles and responsibilities of the judge, the crown prosecutor, defense counsel, the court clerk, court recorder, and sheriff and then work on questions 1, 2 and 4 from page 200 as well as questions 1, 2 and 3 from page 207 of the All About Law text. I'll finish the class with "Question Day" where I'll answer your burning questions that you wanted answered about Criminal Law. 

A Block introduction to Law 9/10 - Today we'll look at the reality of crime in Canada. CTV News Crime Severity. After we'll try to understand what a victim of crime is. We'll discuss victims of crime and victimology and the "Theories of Victimization" (active & passive victimization; deviant place & high risk lifestyles; and routine activities). 

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Wednesday, April 26. 2017

Today's schedule is B-A-D-C

B Block Law 12 - Today, since we got an extra block to finish our project work yesterday, we'll work on look at the advantages of trial by jury and understand the methods and challenges to jury selection. After we'll focus on the presentation of evidence (Crown first then Defence), the rules of evidence (including voire dire), and types of evidence (circumstantial, hearsay, privileged, and character). I'll have you explain the roles and responsibilities of the judge, the crown prosecutor, defense counsel, the court clerk, court recorder, and sheriff and then work on questions 1, 2 and 4 from page 200 as well as questions 1, 2 and 3 from page 207 of the All About Law text. For more on juries in BC check out Justice BC - What is Jury Duty?

A Block Introduction to Law 9/10 - You asked for it...you got it...one more day. That's it though, just one last day for you to work on your crime theory and interview assignment. Check yesterday's blog entry for the deets on what you need to finish it. Be Larry the Cable Guy....Git-R-Done!

D Block Introduction to Psychology 11 - Yesterday we looked at the brain and today we're checking out how the brain is connected to the body. The nervous system can be divided into two major subdivisions: the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS). The CNS is comprised of the brain and spinal cord; the PNS connects the CNS to the rest of the body. We'll check out the autonomic nervous system (sympathetic and parasympathetic systems) along with a tour of the endocrine system (oh glands and hormones). And of course...what would a day in Intro Psych be without Hank Green and a Crash Course video; this one on the endocrine system and hormones.


C Block Social Studies 11 - Today with Ms. Johnson...Canadian efforts during World War One set Canada onto the world map as an autonomous country. With the world viewing Canada as more than just a British colony, national and independent efforts to build a cultural identity emerged and grew during the post war period.

Driven by artists, athletes, youthful exuberance, and growing economic gains, the emergence of a cultural identity led Canada into greater autonomy. From musicians such as Robert Nathaniel Dett to artists including The Group of Seven and Emily Carr from fashion and sports with Fanny “Bobby” Rosenfeld and Tom Longboat, Canadian artists and athletes became symbols within the new County’s identity.

What are symbols you associate with Canada? What developed these symbols? The Canadian Pacific Railway allowed photographers and painters like George Horne Russell to travel for free in an attempt to lure immigrants and travelers onto the train. These images highlighted the natural landscape and the vast, empty, wild north of Canada. In the early 20th century painters in Ontario developed their own style of painting the landscape. Their vivid colours and wild brushstrokes mimicked the Canadian wild and in 1920 they became The Group of Seven. Vast open landscapes that highlight settler ideas of an empty, wild north dominate these wild paintings, but these stunning images also forget the Iroquois Nation. Meanwhile Emily Carr painted coastal BC with similar abandon of light and colour as she focused on capturing the art and culture of Indigenous villages, including their architecture, design and totems. While Carr’s involvement and connection with indigenous communities gained her the title Klee Wyck meaning “laughing one” from the Ucuelet, Yuułuʔiłʔatḥ First Nations, concerns of indigenous cultural appropriation have been raised regarding her paintings and clay bobbles.

As artists developed Canadian landscape and artistic symbolism in Canada, the radio increased opportunities for new cultural ideas to spread across the nation. Baseball and hockey games were broadcasted over radio waves to bring national athletic heroes to households. The radio also transmitted cultural ideas into Canada where Louis Armstrong brought the Jazz age to Canadian listeners.

Monday, April 24, 2017

Tuesday, April 25. 2017

Today's schedule is C-D-A-B

C Block Social Studies 11 - Today with Ms. Johnson...yesterday we looked at trade unions trade union values from Eastern and Western Canada, and discussed the Russian Revolution, the Winnipeg General Strike and the Citizens Committee of One Thousand . We looked at how the One Big Union worked to speak for all workers regardless of their specialty. We also covered how Canadian workers retaliated in fear of not being able to provide for themselves and their families during the Winnipeg General Strike while the government reacted in fear of communist revolt with violent persecution of labour and trade workers.

Today we'll look at the Canadian economy, racism (Residential Schools) and movements towards feminism (Emily Murphy & the "Famous Five").

As the Government worked to settle the country into agricultural and economic booms following the Great War and these union wars, 185,000 settlers from central and eastern Europe began to immigrate into Canada. These immigrants were promised (Along with Eurocentric veterans) plots of land to farm and turn into useful, properly developed agricultural land. In an effort to obtain greater land and resource assets from the First Nations, the Ontario Government set about completing the Williams Treaty  an incomplete treaty wherein treaty outlines were not present upon a blank paper, yet settlers were claiming the unceded land.  The Williams Treaty effectively demolished all fishing and hunting rights of the central and southern First Nations of the region. Additional considerations are the Indian Act and Residential Schools.

As Indigenous Peoples of Canada faced discrimination, they worked to maintain dignity and rights through practicing ceremonies and the potlatch underground and through the development of the League of Indians of Canada


D Block Introduction to Psychology 11 - Yes today...today it's all about the Brain!!!! The brain is a remarkably complex organ comprised of billions of interconnected neurons and glia. It is a bilateral, or two-sided, structure that can be separated into distinct lobes. So today we'll look at brain structure and understand what the following are and what they do: the Medulla; Pons; Thalamus and Hypothalamus; Cerebellum; Amygdala; Hipocampus; Lymbic System; along with the lobes (Frontal, Parietal, Occipital and Temporal) and cortexes (Motor, Prefrontal, Auditory, Visual and Cerebral). We'll also figure out what Neuroplasticity is. I'll have you colour and label a brain lobe diagram and answer a couple of questions for me as well.

This video talks about Dr. Paul Broca...think about
or

 


A Block Introduction to Law 9/10 - Today I have the library booked for you so that you may word process your crime theory interview. Remember, you are a famous Canadian criminologist being interviewed by George Stroumboulopoulos on his CBC television show. What you'll need to do is come up with some crazy, creepy or absurdly normal crime that gained huge notoriety in Canada.

After you create a crime story idea, you'll need to have five questions that George will ask you (no "what's your name" doesn't count as one). Try to come up with questions that you can reasonably answer within three to four sentences..."So what do you think motivated (person X) to commit (action Y)"?

What should this look like? A brief paragraph that introduces the crime and gives a brief biography of you is the start. Check out what they say in the Bio of Stephen King in the video below...

Next write out the five questions George will ask you about the crime, the perpetrator, the kind of person who commits that crime, the motives of that person, an explanation of your personal crime theory and then try to answer them using your theory.

B Block Law 12 - Today we'll look at the advantages of trial by jury and understand the methods and challenges to jury selection. After we'll focus on the presentation of evidence (Crown first then Defence), the rules of evidence (including voire dire), and types of evidence (circumstantial, hearsay, privileged, and character). I'll have you explain the roles and responsibilities of the judge, the crown prosecutor, defense counsel, the court clerk, court recorder, and sheriff and then work on questions 1, 2 and 4 from page 200 as well as questions 1, 2 and 3 from page 207 of the All About Law text. For more on juries in BC check out Justice BC - What is Jury Duty?

Monday, April 24. 2017

Happy birthday to my mother Sally!

Today's schedule is A-B-C-D

A Block Introduction to Law 9/10 - Remember, you need to create your own theory of why crime happens. Use the handout I gave you on crime theories and for more help check out the Crime Theory Web Site found on this link.

After some time, we'll share your own theories of why crime happens (yes I'd like to have volunteers rather than voluntolds). We'll see if there are any similarities amongst the different theories we made and try to understand just what that may mean.

Lastly, I'll ask you to create an interview where you are a famous Canadian criminologist being interviewed by George Stroumboulopoulos on his CBC television show. What you'll need to do is come up with some crazy, creepy or absurdly normal crime that gained huge notoriety in Canada (murder, treason, assault, embezzlement, kidnapping, criminal harassment - AKA stalking, drug trafficking, gang related activities or some minor crime perpetrated by a major Canadian celebrity - oh just imagine Justin Bieber being charged with what). After you create a crime story idea, you'll need to have five questions that George will ask you (no "what's your name" doesn't count as one). Try to come up with questions that you can reasonably answer within three to four sentences..."So what do you think motivated (person X) to commit (action Y)"?

What should this look like? A brief paragraph that introduces the crime and gives a brief biography of you is the start. Next write out the five questions George will ask you about the crime, the perpetrator, the kind of person who commits that crime, the motives of that person, an explanation of your personal crime theory and then try to answer them using your theory.

At 10 or so, we'll continue the really cool video that we started on Friday on the roots of violence from NOVA called Inside the Mind of a Rampage Killer...

What makes a person walk into a theater or a church or a classroom full of students and open fire? What combination of circumstances compels a human being to commit the most inhuman of crimes? Can science in any way help us understand these horrific events and provide any clues as to how to prevent them in the future? As the nation tries to understand the tragic events at Newtown, NOVA correspondent Miles O’Brien separates fact from fiction, investigating new theories that the most destructive rampage killers are driven most of all, not by the urge to kill, but the wish to die. Could suicide–and the desire to go out in a media-fueled blaze of glory–be the main motivation? How much can science tell us about the violent brain?  Most importantly, can we recognize dangerous minds in time—and stop the next Newtown?



B Block Law 12 - Today in Law we'll review our criminal law defences and then we'll examine the court room and we'll look at the three court levels in BC (Provincial, Supreme, and Appellate). After, we'll focus on courtroom organization and then we'll discuss the roles and responsibilities of the judge, the crown prosecutor, defense counsel, the court clerk, court recorder, and sheriff.

C Block Social Studies 11 - Today with Ms. Johnson, who will be working with you all week, you will spend the first part of the class discussing Communism and Trade Unions. You'll briefly look at the Bolshevik Revolution in 1917 and assess its impact on countries throughout Europe and here in Canada. After this you'll discuss what a union is and the perception of unions in 1919. Don't forget the Russian Revolution, which not only took Russia and the Eastern Front out of the war (and put a lot more pressure on Canada and its allies on the Western Front), but helped define world politics throughout the 20th century. You'll have a handout to work on today


D Block Introduction to Psychology 11 -  Okay so we’ve all taken Science and I know that in grade 10 you learned about the structure and function of DNA, about genes and chromosomes, about chemical reactions and energy transfer so we’ll skip that. Remember back in grade 9 when you learned about cells and reproduction? Well, use that prefrontal cortex to search for that deep seated knowledge because you may remember that our behaviours, as well as our thoughts and feelings, are produced by the actions of our brains, nerves, muscles, and glands. A full understanding of the biology underlying psychological processes is an important cornerstone to understand psychology so today we'll look at neurons, neurotransmitters and the chemical mind. I'll give you a week two package and I'll have you watch (below), draw, colour, and fill in the charts today.

Friday, April 21, 2017

Friday, April 21. 2017

FLEX FRIDAY...

AG first, make a plan and then get at it.

I will be available in Room 611 for the Term 3 Introduction to Law family so that you can get missing "Crime Scene Reconstruction" projects submitted. 10 of you did not submit this and on a scale of "Awesome to Notsome" that's kinda on the Notsome end of the scale. For the Term 3 Criminology family please feel free to pop on by to submit work so that you can be all caught up. For Law 12, Social Studies 11 and Intro Psych 11 students I'll be in 611 to help you out today.