Monday, March 6, 2017

Tuesday, March 7. 2017

Today's schedule is C-D-A-B

C Block Social Studies 11 - Today we'll finish up our look at the rights we have in Canada, using the  Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms scavenger hunt we started yesterday with. Yesterday we looked at your fundamental freedoms (section 2) and your equality rights (section 15). Today we'll focus on your legal rights (sections 7-14) and to end the class I'll have you work in partners on two Charter case studies from the All About Law texts in the class...R. v. Keegstra (1990) SCC questions 1-6 from pages 38 & 39 and Irwin Toy Limited v. Attorney General of Quebec (1989) SCC questions 1-7 (however don't do 5b) on pages 45 & 46. Government section done!

D Block Criminology 12 - I'll give you a few notes on the question: Where does violence come from? We'll look at personal traits, ineffective families, evolutionary factors, exposure to violence, cultural values, substance abuse, and firearm availability. After we'll continue our focus on violent crime looking at rape and sexual assault in Canada. We'll examine what a sexual assault is along with the three levels of sexual assault in Canadian Law. After I'd like you to focus on two questions: one on Groth's typology of rapist and the other on the causes for sexual assault.

1. Explain the three types of rapist according to Groth (anger, power, and sadistic)
2. Identify and explain the causes for sexual assault

You'll need to look at evolutionary and biological factors (remember Sigmund Freud's Thantos and Eros or instinctual drives that allowed species to be successful)? Look at modern male socialization (boys are taught to be aggressive, forceful, tough, and dominating...think about how boys play when they're young) and then at hypermasculinity (where some men have callous sexual attitudes and believe that violence is "manly"). Lastly consider both violent experiences (remember that those boys who were exposed to violence in the household are more likely to commit violent acts when they grow older) and sexual motivation (social, cultural, and psychological forces...think about the messages hidden in Axe body spray commercials).
For more info check out the following sites:
Teen Handbook on Sexual Assault (Sarnia Sexual Assault Survivor's Centre)
The Devastation of Sexual Assault (Canadian Resource Centre for Victims of Crime)
Prevent Sexual Violence: Love Shouldn't Hurt Youth Zone
Alberta Association of Sexual Assault Centres

Consider the message that this commercial sends to people...


Now consider what the commercial indicates about sex in modern society. Who is the commercial targeted at and what are the sexual roles in the commercial.

A Block Introduction to Law 9/10 - Today we will start with our second quiz in the course. Your first order of business is to relax and dazzle me with what you know. Then, you'll look at crime scene investigation. You'll start with the basic stages of a search, documenting evidence, and examples of what is included in a crime scene investigator's toolkit.

The following are some great web pages to help understand the procedures:
Learning for Life Crime Scene Search study guide
U.S. Department of Justice Crime Scene Investigation guide

Criminal Profiling Crime Scene searches (FBI guidelines) 

Today we will begin our work on our case study project. An excellent on line resource that you can use is Forensic Magazine - Check out the "Tips" tab (it's a pull down menu and the select "Crime Scene Tips"). Click on the magazine logo below to go to the website.



You will need to imagine that you are a constable in the Comox Valley R.C.M.P. detachment specializing in criminalistics and crime scene analysis. You are going to create a crime scene dossier file that you would normally put together for the Crown Counsel. You have been called out to a crime scene here in the Comox Valley and when you arrive at the scene you need to begin your narrative report. What do you need to do?

•Create a crime (ex: murder, arson, kidnapping, assault)
•Choose eight pieces of evidence (from the list below) that you would find at the crime scene and either help you solve the crime or mislead the investigators
•Create a victim, a perpetrator, two other potential subjects, & witnesses (not necessary)
•Create a dossier file that contains the following: a walk through narrative; pictures of the eight pieces of evidence (with a description, a tag number, and an explanation of where it was found); a detailed crime scene diagram/sketch with pictures of what the crime scene looked like and the identification of evidence; forensics lab sheets for each piece of evidence that describes the evidence and explains what the evidence tells you; transcripts of any interviews conducted by investigators (including potential eyewitnesses or suspects); a narrative of how you "solved" the crime so that the Crown Counsel can move forward with laying charges and proceed to trial.

Evidence to choose from: human hair, synthetic hair, carpet fibres, cotton fibres, bullet cartridges, bullet holes, finger prints, foot/shoe prints, blood stains (drip, splatter, pool), bodily fluids, skin epithelials, tube of lipstick, can of coke, apple core, piece of rope, body, accelerants, matches, money (wallet), poisons, bugs or larvae (blowflies), cigar or cigarette but, mug, tire treads, or any other trace evidence but you must approve the other evidence with me.

B Block Law 12 - Today we will discuss the difference between criminal and immoral behaviour (crime and deviance) and after that we're going to look at the types of criminal offenses (summary conviction, indictable, hybrid). You'll need to work on questions 1-5 on page 123. Here are some websites to help:

Offence Classification at defencelaw.com
Summary Conviction explanation at Duhaime legal information
3 Main Types of Criminal Offences in BC (by John Dykstra)

After, we'll shift into the elements of a crime (with special attention focused on the Mens Rea - intent, knowledge, and recklessness). Actus Reus and Mens Rea come from Actus non facit reum nisi mens sit rea which is Latin for “the act will not make a person guilty unless the mind is also guilty.” To help us understand these concepts we'll look at the R. v. Parks (1992) case and I'll have you and a partner work on the case questions (1-4) together.

1 comment:

Kelsy said...

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