Sunday, March 30, 2014

Monday, March 31. 2014

Today's schedule is A-AG-B-C-D

A Block Social Studies 11 - Today we are going to finish the Laurier Era work we started before Spring Break. attitudes and commonly held beliefs for Canadians in the Laurier Era. Simply put we were mostly British, white, and proud of it so there were challenges to the First Nations, African Canadian and Asian Canadian populations (not to mention the different ethnicities from Europe that weren't British too). For the remainder of the class we'll take a look at the changes to the economy of Canada in the early 20th Century. We'll talk about advances in technology and the resource extraction economy. We'll talk about unions and the gap between wealth and poverty and you'll need to complete questions 1-3 on page 16.  Wednesday we are turning our focus to the underlying causes of the First World War.
B Block Geography 12 - Today we're going to start our new unit on gradation. We've looked at the process of building up the land through tectonics and energy from below. Now we'll focus on breaking down the surface of the Earth and today we cover "geomorphology". We'll look at some slopes on Google Earth and then you will need to work on questions 2, 5, and 6 from page 442 in your Geosystems text. The United States Geological Survey has a good web page on Landslides here and this flash animation website from the University of Kentucky Geology department will help as well. The Atlas of Canada has a good site on Landslides in Canada as does the Geological Survey of Canada.
D Block Social Studies 10 - Today we are going to take a look at the characters involved in the Rebellions of 1837 and 1838. In Upper Canada, Newspaper editor William Lyon Mackenzie (the paper was called The Colonial Advocate) was a fiery reformer and was five times elected to parliament by the citizens of the colony. He was considered as a serious agitator by the Family Compact and at the time he led the rebellion he was mayor of Toronto. Robert Baldwin was a reformer who was also wealthy, well educated, and a member of the Anglican Church. He wished for the governor to do what the elected assembly advised him to do (known as a "responsible government"). Sir Francis Bond Head was the newly appointed governor of Upper Canada in 1836. He accused the Reformers and Radical Reformers of wanting a Republican style of government (like that in the U.S.A.) and being traitors to King William IV and Great Britain.

In Nova Scotia, newspaper editor (the paper was called the Novascotian) Joseph Howe was first elected in 1836, campaigning on a platform of support for responsible government. This was the result of a long campaign against government corruption that ended with him winning a libel lawsuit laid against him. He argued that "the Colonial Governors must be commanded to govern by the aid of those who . . . are supported by a majority of the representative branch.” This measured approach differed from that of Mackenzie and of Louis Joseph Papineau...
Drapeau Quebec Patriotes 1837-38

For Lower Canada (Quebec), there were many issues surrounding the Chateau Clique but the large "elephant in the room" was the Anglophone/Francophone power, culture and language issue. Louis Joseph Papineau, lawyer, seigneur, leader of the Parti Canadien (Parti Patriote) became the voice of the rebellion in Lower Canada. Papineau, like Mackenzie in Upper Canada, promoted an American style Repubican Democracy - one that reflected the French Canadian power base in Lower Canada. After being elected, Papineau and a small committee put forward their demands in the "Ninety-Two Resolutions," which demanded control of revenues by the legislature, for responsibility of the executive and for election of the council. After being took a turn for the worse in Lower Canada (more tomorrow).
The Canadian Encyclopedia Rebellions of 1837
Canadian Library Archives 1837 Rebellion
Histor!CA Rebellions of 1837 page

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